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ZEISS METROTOM 6 scout Now Available at Exact Metrology

Exact Metrology, a comprehensive 3D metrology service provider and hardware sales company, has recently installed a ZEISS METROTOM 6 scout, formally known as a GOM CT, scanner at their facility in Brookfield, Wisconsin.

Considered the powerhouse of resolution for CT inspection and metrology, the METROTOM 6 scout digitizes complex parts including the internal geometries at the finest level of detail. Users obtain a complete 3D image for GD&T analysis or nominal-actual comparisons. The metrology CT excels in digitizing small plastic parts.

The combination of a 3k detector and 225 kV X-ray enables ZEISS METROTOM 6 scout to provide high contrast, high-resolution measurement results and exceptional sharpness of detail. As a result, even the smallest defects in the part become visible and can be analyzed to the last detail.

To showcase the ability of Exact Metrology’s CT scanning services, powered by the METROTOM 6 scout, a scan was done on a medical stent. This medical stent, with a diameter of only 1 millimeter, was measured within a 5 Micron resolution. Thus, Exact Metrology inspectors were able to evaluate critical features with amazing precision.

CT scanning provides several benefits including being the only way to get 3D views inside a part and the only way to obtain accurate dimensional data without cutting up and destroying an object. In addition, CT scanning requires very little time to capture data and troubleshoot parts and also offers multiple uses with one scan (void analysis, inspection, volume, porosity, reverse engineering, etc.). In contrast to conventional tactile coordinate measurement techniques, a CT acquires all surface points simultaneously —on even the most complex objects. This includes all hidden features like undercuts which are not accessible using other non-destructive measurement methods.

Due to its ability to see data layer by layer, CT scanning permitted Exact Metrology inspectors the ability to see any possible defects/details on the stent. This is crucial for any medical device, especially something as small and essential as a stent that goes into the human body.


Exact Metrology is ISO, AS9100 Certified as well as FFL and ITAR Registered.

Exact Metrology, with facilities in Cincinnati, Ohio, Moline, Illinois and Milwaukee, Wisconsin, plus affiliated offices throughout the country, is a comprehensive metrology services provider, offering customers 3D and CT scanning, reverse engineering, quality inspection, product development and 2D drawings.   The company also provides turnkey metrology solutions, including equipment sales and lease/rental arrangements.  

For more information, please contact:

EXACT METROLOGY, INC. 
Dean Solberg
20515 Industry Avenue
Brookfield, WI 53045
Local: 262-533-0800
www.exactmetrology.com
deans@exactmetrology.com

To see optimized part positioning with ZEISS Metrology, please visit https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ch3JuozfqYU&list=PLvaO705pqbydFVDs_K_f0qrZgm1tQ8F9b

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Exact Metrology Helps Restore Sandstone Finials on Cincinnati Music Hall

Exact Metrology, a comprehensive 3D metrology service provider and hardware sales company, is proud to be a part of the restoration of Cincinnati Music Hall’s sandstone ornaments in Cincinnati, Ohio.  The restoration includes ten finials atop gables and a sandstone lyre. 

Partially deteriorated ornament

This project was undertaken by Friends of Music Hall, a volunteer-driven organization whose mission is to preserve, improve, promote and provide education about Cincinnati Music Hall, a National Historic Landmark. Thea Tjepkema, board member and historic preservationist is leading this restoration project on behalf of the Friends of Music Hall.

When the architect Samuel Hannaford designed Cincinnati Music Hall in the High Victorian Gothic style, he included a Gothic fleuron, or finial, on each of the eleven gables.  Over the past 140 years, the original carved sandstone has deteriorated to the point that only portions of these important decorative elements remain.

Exact Metrology scanned the extant ornament pieces using the Artec 3D Leo scanner in HD mode. Produced by Artec 3D, a world-renowned developer and manufacturer of professional 3D scanners and software, Artec 3D LEO has a 3D reconstruction rate of 80 frames per second. This makes it the fastest professional scanner on the market. With its large field of view, Artec LEO can scan and process large objects and scenes quickly and accurately. In addition, the scanner features data acquisition up to 4 million points/second, with a working range of .35-1.2 m.  The 3D resolution on this scanner is up to .5 mm and 3D point accuracy up to .1mm. Artec LEO can scan in sunlight, as well as capture dark and shiny objects. It uses advanced hybrid technology and texture tracking, so users can point at an object and shoot without needing to stick targets.  With no need to connect to a computer or to plug in to a main power source, users can hold the scanner and walk around freely, scanning without the worry of wires or additional equipment.

Arya Design, a Cincinnati based custom casting company, specializing in historic restoration and architectural products, used Exact Metrology’s scanned images to create complete 3D models of the finials and lyre.

Restoring the ornament

The company focuses on custom mold making with exact parameters to meet the design and color that was once there. Their proprietary formulas increase overall compression strength, while replicating the look and feel of historic carved stone. Arya also makes additional architectural cast pieces for new construction for the exterior and interior of commercial and residential buildings.

Chris Lafferty of Exact Metrology commented on this project saying, “Exact Metrology used a handheld  Artec LEO 3D scanner with high definition software to capture images of Cincinnati Music Hall’s sandstone ornamentation. Pointing the scanner at the existing finials and lyre, it used a grid of structured light technology to document their shape. Light bounced back at three million points per second, documenting even the chisel marks.”

Chris Rose of Arya Design concluded, “We are proud to partner with the Friends of Music Hall in creating the pieces needed as the literal “crown jewels” of an amazing historic preservation project.”

Restored sandstone ornament

Exact Metrology is ISO, AS9100 Certified as well as FFL and ITAR Registered.

Exact Metrology, with facilities in Cincinnati, Ohio, Moline, Illinois and Milwaukee, Wisconsin, plus affiliated offices throughout the country, is a comprehensive metrology services provider, offering customers 3D and CT scanning, reverse engineering, quality inspection, product development and 2D drawings.   The company also provides turnkey metrology solutions, including equipment sales and lease/rental arrangements.  

For more information, please contact:

EXACT METROLOGY, INC. 
Steve Young
11575 Goldcoast Drive
Cincinnati, OH 45249
Local: 513.831.6620
Toll Free: 866.722.2600
www.exactmetrology.com
stevey@exactmetrology.com

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Exact Metrology Helps Vintage Car Owner

Exact Metrology, a comprehensive 3D metrology service provider and hardware sales company, recently scanned a unique car model. Exact personnel from the Brookfield, Wisconsin office used reverse engineering to help its owner design the car’s windshield.

Scanning of Speedster Coupe
Scanning of Speedster Coupe

Robert Smith is the owner of a one-off design car — a 1933 Speedster Coupe.  The car needed a special sized windshield which is no longer produced by any glass manufacturers. Smith contacted Curved Glass Creations, in Pompano Beach, Florida, to find out if they could supply him with the windshield. While the company wasn’t able to help, they did reach out to Exact Metrology with this special request.

Joe van der Sanden from Exact Metrology completed the scan at the client’s location using a Hexagon Absolute Arm 8525 with an RS6 scanner. The Hexagon Absolute Arm 7-axis delivers tactile probing and laser scanning in a uniquely ergonomic package. It is ideal for high-end portable measurement applications. The articulating arm offers ease of movement and ease of measurement.  The Hexagon RS6 laser scanner is designed for high-speed and accuracy scanning.  It scans up to 1.2 million points/sec with a scan rate of 300 Hz. The RS6 also has a wider laser stripe of 150 mm at mid-range and a visual guide that provides real time feedback for stand-off distance.  Built using SHINE technology (Systematic High-Intelligence Noise Elimination), it allows users to easily scan 99% of parts without touching the scanner exposure. With the Hexagon Absolute Arm 7-axis, the scanner can be removed if necessary and replaced without need for calibration.  Furthermore, with the arm mounted scanner, it is easier to measure due to less preparation, less set up, less settings and scans with full frame, with full line width, all the time.

Exact Metrology scan data
Exact Metrology scan data

Once the scan was completed, the file format was agreed to and delivered to Curved Glass Creations.  They were able to make the custom windshield. Robert Smith commented that he had a unique experience reaching out to the 3D image industry to ensure the accuracy of the glass created for his Alloway Speedstar. He was pleased that the scan was completed on-site and that Exact Metrology explained the process well to both him and the glass manufacturer. Smith concluded,” I never suspected my car built at “Speedy’s Rod and Kustom’s” would require such high technology! I can’t thank Exact Metrology enough for their involvement and making it look easy.”      


Exact Metrology is ISO9001, AS9100 Certified as well as FFL and ITAR Registered.

Exact Metrology, with facilities in Cincinnati, Ohio, Moline, Illinois and Milwaukee, Wisconsin, plus affiliated offices throughout the country, is a comprehensive metrology services provider, offering customers 3D and CT scanning, reverse engineering, quality inspection, product development and 2D drawings. The company also provides turnkey metrology solutions, including equipment sales and lease/rental arrangements.  

For information, please contact:

EXACT METROLOGY, INC. 
Dean Solberg
20515 Industry Avenue
Brookfield, WI 53045
Local: 262-533-0800
www.exactmetrology.com
deans@exactmetrology.com

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Siemens and Ingersoll Machine Tools expanding Digital Enterprise partnership

Robotic fiber placement and 3D printing enable disruptive breakthroughs in today’s manufacturing processes thanks to the advantages promised by Industry 4.0, the Digital Twin, higher robotic intelligence and complex motion control.

Siemens and Ingersoll Machine Tools have expanded their decade-long partnership to support the Rockford, IL-based machine tool company of Camozzi Group on its digital journey of creating digital twins of its products and expanding into new markets. Based upon extensive experience in heavy machine tool building, Siemens cutting-edge technologies in hardware complement Ingersoll Machine Tools’ successful journey into the new market of additive manufacturing and have pushed the boundaries for industrial robots for the aerospace market with its entry-level robotic platforms MasterPrint Robotic™ and MasterPrint Continuous Filament™

For example, Ingersoll developed the mammoth 3D printer MasterPrint™, the world’s largest device that prints with thermoplastics. The MasterPrint  at the University of Maine — included in the Guinness Book of World Records — is able to  3D-print objects up to 100 feet long, 20 feet wide and 10 feet tall. It is designed mainly to make tools for the aerospace, space and marine industry. MasterPrint™ cuts cost and streamlines the manufacturing process. Large parts are printed and then machined to final their shape with the same machine. Manufacturing costs can be reduced by 75% and lead times shortened from months to days.

“As a key supplier of high-tech manufacturing equipment to all the major players of the aerospace industry, Ingersoll has strategic technology goals that push CNC products capabilities and performance beyond their OEMs’ intentions, conception and scope in term of accuracy, reliability, ease of integration and seamless programming experience. Ingersoll has found a CNC and software partner in Siemens who is willing to develop and encompass these advanced capabilities into their products and to enable Ingersoll to achieve its strategic goals and service the needs of our customers by shortening their time-to-market and increasing their profitability”, said Piergiorgio Assandri, Business Director, Ingersoll Machine Tools.

“Ingersoll Machine Tools’ ambitious plans for becoming a leading digital enterprise in the machine tool market are impressive. Their successful additive manufacturing and industrial robot products are a proof point for this. Ingersoll Machine Tools’ entrepreneurial spirit and innovative approach has pushed us to the limits, what our technology is capable of and inspired us to go even further”, said Rajas Sukthankar, Vice-President of Siemens Digital Industries Motion Control Business (US). 

Ingersoll Machine Tools is using cutting-edge CNC automation hardware and software from Siemens to transform their business for the digital age. With the Siemens Virtual NC Kernel (VNCK), the company was able embed the real CNC kernel into a virtual machine, allowing Ingersoll Machine Tools to completely emulate real machine tool control and directly import the commissioning archive of the actual machine. That helped Ingersoll Machine Tools to save time with faster commissioning and to get the machine to their customers faster. From an end-customer perspective, users will be able to simulate the manufacturing of their product and shorten their time-to-market while increasing their production quality.    

“Composite production processes such as the increasingly popular robotic applications can have quite complex machine motions and tight manufacturing tolerances, as well as the ever present need to reduce production times.  Having a virtual version of the CNC kernel directly integrated within the programming and simulation software environment allows a customer to more reliably validate their production processes and timing before physically running anything on the machine.” said John Dreher, Software Engineering Manager, Ingersoll Machine Tools.

To handle the complex machining applications, Ingersoll Machine Tools chose the modular, scalable and open Sinumerik 840D sl CNC system from Siemens, which is considered to be
the control of choice in high-end machining segments like aerospace. High CNC machining performance, along with flexibility and openness, represent the basis for almost every machine tool concept.

Engineers from aerospace and other large-part industries come to Ingersoll Machine Tools
to collaborate on breakthroughs in additive and subtractive manufacturing

The promised advantages of digitalization are being implemented by Ingersoll Machine Tools.
Having removed the boundaries to large-format robotic fiber placement and 3D printing,
expectations now rise toward making breakthrough improvements across the entire part
production process.

Run MyRobot is a key feature on the Siemens Sinumerik 840D sl CNC, bringing precision control to the robotic machines at Ingersoll.


Contact for journalists:

John Meyer
Phone: +1 847 952 4158
E-mail: john.meyer@siemens.com


Follow us on Social Media:
www.twitter.com/siemens_cnc_us            www.facebook.com/Siemens.CNC.US  

Siemens Digital Industries (DI) is an innovation leader in automation and digitalization. Closely collaborating with partners and customers, DI drives the digital transformation in the process and discrete industries. With its Digital Enterprise portfolio, DI provides companies of all sizes with an end-to-end set of products, solutions and services to integrate and digitalize the entire value chain. Optimized for the specific needs of each industry, DI’s unique portfolio supports customers to achieve greater productivity and flexibility. DI is constantly adding innovations to its portfolio to integrate cutting-edge future technologies. Siemens Digital Industries has its global headquarters in Nuremberg, Germany, and has around 75,000 employees internationally.

Siemens Corporation is a U.S. subsidiary of Siemens AG, a global powerhouse focusing on the areas of power generation and distribution, intelligent infrastructure for buildings and distributed energy systems, and automation and digitalization in the process and manufacturing industries. Through the separately managed company Siemens Mobility, a leading supplier of smart mobility solutions for rail and road transport, Siemens is shaping the world market for passenger and freight services. Due to its majority stakes in the publicly listed companies Siemens Healthineers AG and Siemens Gamesa Renewable Energy, Siemens is also a world-leading supplier of medical technology and digital healthcare services as well as environmentally friendly solutions for onshore and offshore wind power generation. For more than 160 years, the company has innovated and invented technologies to support American industry spanning manufacturing, energy, healthcare and infrastructure. In fiscal 2018, Siemens USA reported revenue of $23.7 billion, including $5.0 billion in exports, and employs approximately 50,000 people throughout all 50 states and Puerto Rico.

Ingersoll Machine Tools Inc is a leader in advanced manufacturing processes and a global supplier of additive and subtractive machine tools for the aerospace, defense, energy and all heavy industrial sectors. The Ingersoll product lineup includes MasterMill™, PowerMill™ and SuperProfiler™ for accurate, reliable, high-speed milling and trimming of large, complex-geometry parts made of aluminum, titanium and hard metals; Mongoose™ and Mongoose Hybrid™, for the composite manufacturing of aircrafts’, rockets’ and vessels’ structures; MasterPrint™, the largest existing thermoplastic 3D printer, capable to produce extra-large, hollow, parts in a single piece for the aerospace and the marine sectors. Ingersoll runs these very same machines at its Development Center to manufacture key-components for many aerospace and defense programs. Together with Innse-Berardi (Lombardy, Italy), Ingersoll is part of the Camozzi Machine Tools division of the Camozzi Group. With 30 subsidiaries in 75 countries, 2600 employees, 5 operating divisions and 18 production sites, the Camozzi Group is a global leader in the supply of components and systems for industrial automation and operates in other strategic sectors: Automation, Manufacturing, Digitalization and Textile Machinery

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Kodlin Siemens

Easily creating one-offs

Kodlin Motorcycle customizes motorcycles based upon bikes from the legendary American brand Harley-Davidson. Sophisticated technology and an easy-to-use control system are essential—which is why the company chose the Sinumerik 828D CNC from Siemens.

There is no denying it: the Kodlin family has motorcycles in its blood. Master blacksmith Fred Kodlin gave his son Len his first motocross bike for his fifth birthday. There was never really any question about what Len would do when he grew up. Today, the father-and-son team runs the Fred Kodlin Motorcycle workshop, founded by Fred Kodlin back in 1984, in the small town of Borken in the German state of Hessen.

The company is highly specialized: together, father, son and 10 employees customize Harley-Davidson motorcycles. Up to 50 motorcycles leave their shopfloor each year, to the great excitement of their new owners. Many customers simply want to have their series-produced bikes adjusted to suit them better, or to look more individual. Other customers come to the company looking for bigger modifications, such as the installation of a big front wheel, which has a very striking effect and is popular among Harley-Davidson fans.

The most passionate bikers, however, want their bikes to be completely personalized. “These unique bikes cannot be beaten in terms of exclusivity. When it comes to design and technology, we make the virtually impossible possible,” explains junior manager Len Kodlin. In some of these models, the only thing that’s left is the engine, with its unmistakable Harley-Davidson sound: the rest of the bike is made up of components that have been developed and produced entirely by Kodlin. Customers’ budgets are the only thing limiting their imagination. Enthusiasts pay up to $130,000 for these unique cycles. And then, of course, there are also the technical approval restrictions (TÜV, for example).

Avoiding imitations

When fulfilling a customer’s dream of owning a personalized motorcycle, the customizers at Kodlin Motorcycle not only adapt parts, they also manufacture many individual parts themselves. Various styles of footboards, footpegs, turn-signal trim, air filters, engine covers, hand grips and mirror brackets are manufactured individually or in very small series. Outsourcing production could be cheaper in many cases, but for Kodlin, this is not an option. Len Kodlin explains the reasoning behind the decision. “Unique pieces are the basis of our whole company. The risk of copies appearing is simply too great. Our customers pay for something unique and that’s what we give them. This is why we do everything ourselves, from sheet-metal work and welding to milling, turning, painting and assembly,” Kodlin says.

Kodlin has an extremely large range of manufacturing capabilities to prevent imitations and rival products, thus safeguarding its competitive edge. The company invests heavily in production expertise and machinery. Kodlin even has a world manufacturer identifier. This official designation signals that Kodlin is officially a manufacturer that can build and approve motorcycles.

An integrated process from the design to the machine

Anyone who wants to survive the competition as a small, independent customizer needs top-quality CNC machines. That’s why the core of Kodlin’s production process is a PreMill VL 1000 CNC machining center from MMD Werkzeugmaschinen with a Sinumerik 828D CNC system. Len Kodlin, a trained precision mechanic himself, explains what matters to him and his father, “MMD was extremely cooperative and, with the PreMill VL 1000, gave us a machine that meets our needs perfectly. The price/performance ratio was good and with the Sinumerik 828D control—including the intuitive Sinumerik Operate graphical user interface—our core requirement, namely ease-of-operation, was met to our utmost satisfaction.”

The demands on the machine tool and control system are high and diverse. Many simple parts are programmed directly on the machine. For this type of application, it is important for the shopfloor programming to be as simple as it is reliable and efficient. Jan Rosenkranz, a mechanic on the Kodlin team, gets straight to the point, “The ShopMill menu-based navigation makes everything really quick and easy.” He also appreciates the convenient setup functions.

The production of custom parts, which often involves extremely complex contouring, is entirely different. The junior manager creates the programs for these parts separately at an external CAD/CAM workstation and then transfers them to the machine, using a USB stick. This means the machine can remain in operation while the junior manager can design parts for his spectacular creations, far away from production noise, in peace and quiet. Once the blank is in place, the entire machining process itself goes very quickly. With the help of various Sinumerik CNC cycles, the workpiece and the tool are set up quickly and machining on the PreMill VL 1000 can begin.

Len Kodlin specifically mentions the clearly organized folder structure in Sinumerik Operate, which is designed in a similar way to that found on a traditional PC. Meaningful names—such as “Handlebar1-Customer3”—with up to 28 characters can be assigned to the programs. This improves the ability to maintain an overview and products that have already been made can be clearly identified and accessed again at a later date.

The entire production spectrum covered

In terms of production technology, the PreMill VL 1000 offers everything needed for bike parts. The machine gets extra points for its framework construction, which makes it very stable and easily accessible. The majority of the components are less than 500 mm long. However, there are exceptions, such as long fork tubes. With travel paths of X = 1020 mm, Y = 510 mm, and Z = 560 mm, plus a 1200 x 500 mm clamping table, the machine comprehensively covers the spectrum. The 10-kW milling spindle provides the power needed to quickly and precisely machine the parts, which are usually made of aluminum or steel. The changer can be equipped with up to 30 tools and the linear guides on all three axes ensure utmost precision. According to Jens Bubenheim, a sales consultant at MMD, the PreMill VL 1000 achieves a repeat accuracy of ± 3 µm and a positioning accuracy of ± 5 µm, which means that the desired quality is always guaranteed.

A special feature on the Sinumerik 828D CNC scores additional points for high quality, namely the Sinumerik MDynamics technology package with integrated Advanced Surface motion control. The program sequence can be set or adjusted at any time, ensuring that the machine generates an optimal ratio of speed, accuracy and surface quality. Take the turn signal trim, for example.  In this case, production accuracy is of less significance. Corresponding settings in MDynamics and the activated Advanced Surface therefore ensure that the machine works with a focus on both surface quality and speed of production.


Contact for journalists and product information:

John Meyer
Marketing Communications Manager
Siemens Industry, Inc.
390 Kent Avenue
Elk Grove Village, IL 60007
T: +1 847 640 1595
E: john.meyer@siemens.com
Website: usa.siemens.com/cnc

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Siemens expands its drive portfolio with a new extra-low-voltage drive for 24–48V EC motors. The new Micro-Drive system brings industrial networking and integrated safety to a wide range of applications including battery operated equipment.

Siemens introduces its new Simatic Micro-Drive — the new servo-drive system for extra-low-voltage commercial and manufacturing applications

User benefits include seamless network integration, integrated drive safety, versatility, easy commissioning and servicing  

Siemens expands its drive portfolio with a new extra-low-voltage drive for 24–48V EC motors. The new Micro-Drive system brings industrial networking and integrated safety to a wide range of applications including battery operated equipment.

Siemens is extending its drive portfolio in the safety extra-low-voltage range for 24-48V EC motors by introducing a new servo drive system named Simatic Micro-Drive.  The new system with UL and CE marked components consists of the PDC (Profidrive Control) servo drive in conjunction with a flexible range of motors and connecting cables from product partners.

Simple connectivity to Simatic programmable logic controllers (PLCs) helps significantly reduce the engineering workload, while integration into Siemens automation technology via its TIA Portal makes for simple commissioning and servicing.  Attributes such as smart encoders and one-button tuning add to its plug-and-play startup. Communication takes place over Profinet using Profisafe and Profidrive profiles.  The new Safety Integrated function SLT (Safely Limited Torque) limits torque by monitoring motor current in running operation.

The Simatic Micro-Drive will offer units from 100 watts to 1 kilowatt and allow side-by-side rail mounting.  The Micro-Drive PDC is available in a standard (only hardwired Safe Torque Off (STO)) and fail-safe version.  STO, SS1, SLT, SLS, and SSM Safety Integrated functions are included with the Micro-Drive F variant.  TIA Portal can be used to activate the safety functions with a Fail-safe PLC via PROFIsafe.  Operating data can be transmitted directly to the controller from the Micro-Drive and transferred to Cloud-based platforms such as MindSphere over MindConnect.

To address its customers’ requirements with maximum flexibility, Siemens utilizes product partnerships with companies such as Dunkermotoren, ebm-pabst, Harting and KnorrTec when it comes to the motors and cables used with Micro-Drive.  The servo drive system is suited to a wide range of diverse applications such as precise positioning, shuttles for storage and retrieval machines or warehousing systems, automatic guided vehicle systems (AGVs) and medical technology.

Siemens expands its drive portfolio with a new extra-low-voltage drive for 24–48V EC motors. The new Micro-Drive system brings industrial networking and integrated safety to a wide range of applications including battery operated equipment.

Website:  http://usa.siemens.com/micro-drive

Siemens Digital Industries (DI) is an innovation leader in automation and digitalization. Closely collaborating with partners and customers, DI drives the digital transformation in the process and discrete industries. With its Digital Enterprise portfolio, DI provides companies of all sizes with an end-to-end set of products, solutions and services to integrate and digitalize the entire value chain. Optimized for the specific needs of each industry, DI’s unique portfolio supports customers to achieve greater productivity and flexibility. DI is constantly adding innovations to its portfolio to integrate cutting-edge future technologies. Siemens Digital Industries has its global headquarters in Nuremberg, Germany, and has around 75,000 employees internationally.

Siemens Corporation is a U.S. subsidiary of Siemens AG, a global powerhouse focusing on the areas of power generation and distribution, intelligent infrastructure for buildings and distributed energy systems, and automation and digitalization in the process and manufacturing industries. Through the separately managed company Siemens Mobility, a leading supplier of smart mobility solutions for rail and road transport, Siemens is shaping the world market for passenger and freight services. Due to its majority stakes in the publicly listed companies Siemens Healthineers AG and Siemens Gamesa Renewable Energy, Siemens is also a world-leading supplier of medical technology and digital healthcare services as well as environmentally friendly solutions for onshore and offshore wind power generation. For more than 160 years, the company has innovated and invented technologies to support American industry spanning manufacturing, energy, healthcare and infrastructure. In fiscal 2018, Siemens USA reported revenue of $23.7 billion, including $5.0 billion in exports, and employs approximately 50,000 people throughout all 50 states and Puerto Rico.

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1. Liberty of Poetry scanned by Artec Eva. Kent State team. From left to right: Nate Mucha, Robert Clements, David Hassler, Joshua Talbott, JR Campbell, Tammy Honesty, Steve Sawicki, Tetta Askeland and Alex Barnhart.

Exact Metrology Scanned “Liberty of Poetry”

Liberty of Poetry scanned by Artec Eva - 3d scan
Liberty of Poetry scanned by Artec Eva

From October 11, 2019 to April 26, 2020, the Ellis Island National Museum of Immigration in New York exhibited “Sisters in Liberty: From Florence, Italy to New York, New York.” The exhibit was a collaboration between Kent State University in Kent, Ohio and the Opera di Santa Croce, a nonprofit organization in charge of the Franciscan Cathedral Santa Croce. Through art and multimedia presentations, the exhibit looked to start an international conversation about the meaning of liberty and how the concept had evolved.

The exhibit featured an 80% to scale replica of Pio Fedi’s “Liberty of Poetry,” housed at the church. It is said to have served as the basis for the Statue of Liberty. “Liberty of Poetry” honors Giovanni Battista Niccolini, a poet who inspired and supported the Resorgimento the Italian struggle for self-determination.

With permission from the Vatican, Kent neuroscientist Robert Clements and Josh Talbott, both of whom have a background in 3D imaging, traveled to Florence to scan the statue over a three-day period using technology provided by Exact Metrology.

Different angle scan with Artec Eva - 3d scan
Different angle scan with Artec Eva.

Kent State University rented the Artec Eva scanner and Artec Studio software. Chris Lafferty at Exact Metrology provided the university with equipment, training and support. The Artec Eva, provided by Artec 3D, is used for making a quick, textured and accurate 3D model of medium sized objects. It scans quickly, capturing precise measurements in high resolution. Not only does it capture almost any type of object (including black and shiny surfaces), but it is used in numerous industries including quality control, heritage preservation, forensics, automotive, medical, aerospace and prosthetics. Artec Studio makes it easy to obtain accurate 3D models. It features an advanced smart mode that guides users through post-processing, automatically selecting the most effective settings for the data and producing a high precision 3D model. It offers best in class texture and geometry tracking, thus eliminating the need for targets on objects. Whether using Autopilot or manual mode, the software never compromises on precision. Furthermore, powerful algorithms process data in seconds and Artec Studio features a full range of advanced settings. Users can scan and process data on a tablet.

After scanning the statue, Clements and Talbott returned to Kent State to process 30 to 40 gigabytes of data and create a blueprint for a 3D printer.

Freshmade3D, a Youngstown-based start-up company, printed the replica in three sections, so the statues could be transported easily to New York. The statue was painted by a team of students at Kent State and combines sand and resin to replicate the original.

Commenting on this project, Chris Lafferty said, “This was a great experience for us as we got to see the finished product and how Exact Metrology contributed to this. We look forward to more collaborations like this in the future.”


Exact Metrology is an ISO 9001:2008 and AS9100 Certified Company 

Exact Metrology, with facilities in Cincinnati, OH, Moline, IL and Milwaukee, WI and affiliated offices throughout the country, is a comprehensive metrology services provider, offering customers 3D and CT scanning, reverse engineering, quality inspection, product development and 2D drawings. The company also provides turnkey metrology solutions, including equipment sales and lease/rental arrangements. 

Exact Metrology offers a complete line of portable scanning and measurement technologies as well as contract measurement for 3D laser scanning services, reverse engineering services, non-contact inspection, metrology services, and 3D digitizing. The company’s newest equipment includes a CT Scanner, the first in America being used for metrology rather than medical testing. Exact sells and rents metrology equipment solutions, in addition to providing testing as a service and application software training.

For information, please contact:

Steve Young
Exact Metrology, Inc.
11575 Goldcoast Drive
Cincinnati, OH 45249
Local: 513-831-6620
Toll free: 855-476-1431
www.exactmetrology.com
stevey@exactmetrology.com

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Grieve Truck Oven

550°F Truck Oven From Grieve

Grieve Truck OvenThis Grieve oven is a 550°F (288°C) new truck oven customized from the standard TCH-550 model and is currently used for heat processing parts at the customer’s facility. Workspace dimensions of this oven measure 60” W x 60” D x 60” H.  30 KW are installed in Incoloy sheathed tubular heating elements, while a 2000 CFM, 2 HP recirculating blower provides horizontal airflow to the workload.

This Grieve truck oven has 6” insulated walls, an aluminized steel interior and aluminized steel exterior with enamel finish. Features include a purge timer, two-position dampers on fresh air inlet and exhaust outlet and a 1200 lb. capacity stainless steel loading truck. Additional features include a 325 CFM powered forced exhauster with an airflow safety switch. The oven includes all safety equipment required by NFPA Standard 86, IRI, FM and OSHA.

Controls on this Grieve oven include a UL listed control panel, a programmable temperature controller, SCR power controller, a circular chart recorder and a circuit breaker disconnect switch mounted through control panel door.


For more information, please contact:

THE GRIEVE CORPORATION

500 Hart Road
Round Lake, IL 60073-2898
Phone:  (847) 546-8225
Fax:  (847) 546-9210
Web:  www.grievecorp.com
Email:  sales@grievecorp.com
Attention:  Frank Calabrese, VP

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Exact Metrology Reverse Engineering Final Product

Exact Metrology Showcases Potential of Reverse Engineering

Exact Metrology Reverse Engineering CT ScanGreenery 33 is a company in Cincinnati, Ohio that produces creative and unique plant holders and pots.  The company donates 33% of their earnings to environmental protection agencies. One of Exact’s engineers is friendly with Greenery 33’s owner, so Exact Metrology participated in a marketing campaign aimed to show the process of reverse engineering and how it can used with various materials.

Exact Metrology Reverse Engineering Plant HoldersThe first step was to scan and have a digital copy of a physical skull.  Secondly, the skull was reverse engineered using Geomagic DesignX software and NURBS. Geomagic is a leading provider of 3D software to create digital models of physical objects for industries such as: archaeology, aerospace, medical and dental, tooling, foundry and sculpture and arts. The Geomagic Design X combines history-based CAD with 3D scan data processing, enabling users to create feature-based, edible solid models compatible with existing CAD software. NURBS, or Non-Uniform Rational B-spline is used to represent curves and surfaces. Next, surface analysis is performed with Geomagic Design X for parametric modeling. Afterwards, NURBS is inspected with a color map against the scanned data of Geomagic. Lastly, .stl files rendered in Keyshot 3D of the skull are placed in product shots for Greenery 33.

Exact Metrology Reverse Engineering Final ProductThis process took two days. By using reverse engineering, Exact Metrology showed Greenery 33 an efficient and cost-saving way of working with materials like plastic, glass and ceramic without physically reconstructing it.


Exact Metrology is an ISO 9001:2008 and AS9100 Certified Company 

Exact Metrology, with facilities in Cincinnati, OH, Moline, IL and Milwaukee, WI and affiliated offices throughout the country, is a comprehensive metrology services provider, offering customers 3D and CT scanning, reverse engineering, quality inspection, product development and 2D drawings.   The company also provides turnkey metrology solutions, including equipment sales and lease/rental arrangements.  

Exact Metrology offers a complete line of portable scanning and measurement technologies as well as contract measurement for 3D laser scanning services, reverse engineering services, non-contact inspection, metrology services, and 3D digitizing. The company’s newest equipment includes a CT Scanner, the first in America being used for metrology rather than medical testing. Exact sells and rents metrology equipment solutions, in addition to providing testing as a service and application software training.

 

For information, please contact:

EXACT METROLOGY, INC.
Dean Solberg
20515 Industry Avenue
Brookfield, WI 53045
Local: 262-533-0800
www.exactmetrology.com
deans@exactmetrology.com

 

EXACT METROLOGY, INC.
Steve Young
11575 Goldcoast Drive
Cincinnati, OH 45249
Local: 513.831.6620
Toll Free: 866.722.2600
www.exactmetrology.com
stevey@exactmetrology.com

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Facet Precision Tool — Key to Success

Jeremy Bunting leverages insights gained from growing up in a hugely successful cutting tool business to build a brand new specialist company – Facet Tools

Jeremy Bunting, Managing Director of Facet Precision Tool grew up in the cutting tool industry, getting a hands-on education from a young age and then using this experience to start his own business. From laying out a brand-new manufacturing center; to shaping and promoting Facet’s reputation; to training up a high performing team who are passionate about the craft of cutting tools – Jeremy has built the foundations for success.

Jeremy begins:

I started designing my first tools at age 14 in America as part of the family business, using manual grinding as well as conventional grinding to manufacture tools. After that I moved on to the applications side – getting exposure to feeds and speeds and eventually moved to Europe.  In Europe I worked for different tooling manufacturers, seeing different approaches to manufacturing and precision tooling.

I started Facet Precision Tools in 2015 primarily to service the aerospace and automotive sectors. Both these markets require special tools with distinct needs. At Facet we produce PCD, carbide cutting and coated carbide tools through distributors and direct to customers. Based in Germany we sell locally as well as to France, England and Spain. Through distributors we service Africa, Sweden, Turkey, Hungary, Austria, Italy and Mexico.

It’s challenging starting a new business. We had a market and products in mind and were in a unique position where we could decide, if these are our target markets, what machinery and equipment do we need? I considered my past experiences in the industry and how can I apply any learnings to the future. When we entered the market, I wanted to have high quality equipment, robust manufacturing processes and be producing market leading cutting tools.

Since opening we have been growing steadily, in fact last year we doubled our sales. As we expand we are looking at how we can attract more customers, consider if we need to add additional products and as many people in the industry experience – are always looking for good people.

Establishing grinding capabilities

After deciding on a shop floor blue print, we invested in a range of ANCA machines with two MX7 Linear’s, an FX7 and an EDGe as well as other equipment. We use the MX7s primarily for automotive tooling as they work well when grinding tools with larger diameters of 20, 25 and 32. We also run a lot of pocket grinding for PCD cutting tools on this model. The MX7 has a lot of horsepower that allows us to grind these tools in a very stable way. We use the FX for high volume carbide tooling. As an extremely rigid and thermally dynamic, stable machine I can rely on it to grind highly repeatable cutting tools.

On the MX7 we have an ANCA spindle speeder that allows us to achieve higher rpm. We worked with ANCA to adjust the software to be able to provide a better stable pocket and more accurate pockets in our grinding process.

On the EDGe we manufacture PCD tools. In the past couple years we have been developing PCD vein tools with our own blanks and cutting tool designs – working through and refining our processes. The EDGe has allowed us to have a high degree of accuracy when trying to grind a lot of the geometries. I found that as a process, erosion enabled the repeatability and the quality we were looking for. We also added a vision camera system on the EDGe, allowing for a quick inspection inside the machine, to get higher repeatability and better quality versus taking it out of the machine, and putting it back in.

And then there is ANCA’s 3D Simulator program. Up to 95% of the designs and problem solving are done on the simulator; testing the grinding process, reviewing and modifying before you go into a machine. It is our strongest tool to increase efficiency and reduce waste and that is a major help to our profitability. For example, carbide is extremely expensive where you can be paying from 400 euros for a 32mm standard rod.

The simulator also shows estimated grinding times which has been a great tool for us to reduce cycle times. Last time it took us, for example, 20 minutes to make this tool, but after considering a new idea or different approach we can reduce that time to 18, 17 or even 15 minutes all through experimenting in a simulated grinding environment.

We have touch probes on all the machines that allow us to easily change wheel packs, qualify the wheel and start moving quickly. It also allows us to remove human error and ensures a higher finished quality. To be able to dress and probe the wheel, picking back up where you left off without having to change the setup is very advantageous.

One of the main reasons we love the ANCA machines is because of the software. We have found it to be extremely flexible and at Facet we don’t use a lot of the standard ANCA programs and designs and instead do a lot of our work in profile editor, changing angles and profiles to meet the tool designs that we need. My Dad always said that ANCA was a software company that built a machine.

Part 2
Facet Precision Tool comments on why building a team of craftspeople is key to success and whether the electric car be the demise of the cutting tools

Jeremy Bunting, Managing Director of Facet Precision Tool grew up in the cutting tool industry, getting a hands-on education from a young age and then using this experience to start his own business. From laying out a brand-new manufacturing center; to shaping and promoting Facet’s reputation; to training up a high performing team who are passionate about the craft of cutting tools – Jeremy has built the foundations for success.

Specials are a relationship business – requiring communication and trust

As we build our company we want to be known for quality. From the start we have been trying to build our reputation for offering high quality tools rather than just entering a market and throwing anything out there and seeing what sticks. We are methodical in our approach to manufacturing certain tools or entering a marketplace or approaching certain things. Even if this means we are a bit slower and more tactful.

Just as important, is our responsiveness to the customer through deliveries and application support. These are the foundation of our company. We start by listening – what does the customer want to achieve, am I understanding their needs correctly? Then I consider how the product could be improved, can we make other recommendations. We turn that request into a tool design that is checked by the customer.

In aerospace, a common misunderstanding is the need for standard tools. Tools for aerospace require different lengths, diameters and applications. There is also a high requirement for accuracy, in Europe for example, we find aerospace have applications that need to be measured to a couple of microns and use a variety of methodology to make holes in different materials. It is a challenge making a product meet quality standards while working across a range of material applications.

Building a team of craftspeople

I think working in specialty tools excites an element of craftsmanship. Every day is different, and you can take pride in your work, was it correct, was it to print? That is why we look for a person who is flexible, shows an ability to learn, grow, and absorb information.

I train everybody in my plant like they’ve never seen a grinding machine before. We invest time to build their knowledge base to understanding the manufacturing and measuring equipment. Again, partially because we’re into specials where every tool design is different, we don’t have pre-written programs.

I think one of the best characteristics of a toolmaker is an attention to detail. Often people can become over invested in the productivity side – how many parts can I get through, how fast can I get them through the line. I train my team to be focused on the quality of the tool first and productivity second. And to meet these expectations of quality you have to have a high attention to detail.

Just as important is to develop your team to have a passion for grinding. The more passion someone has for the product, the more likely they are to stay. Teaching your employee how to make a better-quality tool feeds their creativity and teaches them it is ok to have your own approach and style. At Facet we have an open dialogue with our teams of why we do the things that we do.

Trends in the market – will the electric car be the demise of the cutting tools?

If I think about what I am seeing in the market I would say there is more competition in the automotive field than there is in the aerospace field, probably because aerospace requires more project work, more support, more testing, more engagement with the customer. Automotive expects high quality tools at very high tolerances, we have reamers that have tolerances of only a couple of microns. Another focus for this industry is price.

As the use of composites in aerospace has increased so has the demand for PCD or diamond coated tools. For example, the Dreamliner or A350 or Boeing Dreamliner uses a large amount of composites. These are extremely abrasive so if you use a carbide tool to grind composite materials, initially the tool works great but the wear curve is extremely high so after a 150 holes, the amount of wear is accelerated on that tool until it becomes blunt.

This changes the dynamic of the cutting, the heat, burr creation; causing problems for the manufacturer. Whereas if you use a qualified diamond or PCD tool, you may be able to make up to 1500 holes. For a customer that means higher productivity, fewer changeovers, less inventory and a higher degree of quality for a longer period of time.

There is speculation that combustion motors will disappear and as motors disappear then the need for a lot of the cutting tools disappears. This is bringing up questions on how much electric cars will replace all other means of transportation. Personally I think there are a lot of hurdles that have to be overcome and we will see other opportunities as the market changes. I think as far as aluminum and composite manufacturing is concerned we will see them trying to go lighter to make combustion engines more efficient.

I think there will always be a need for niche and special products and that means more special cutting tools. That’s one of the reasons why we were very comfortable moving into this industry. So as materials change – if it’s more glass, carbon composites or aluminum – we’re in a good position to move with the market and respond to those changes. I have established the foundations of Facet Precision Tools to be agile with design expertise, workforce skills and manufacturing capabilities. We can and do adapt and invest in the machinery or develop our knowledge so we can meet the markets’ changing needs rather than focusing on materials.


For further information, please contact:
Sepideh Zandieh
PR and Communications Manager, ANCA
M: +61 439 316 131
Sepideh.Zandieh@anca.com

ANCA is a market leading manufacturer of CNC grinding machines. It was founded in 1974 in Melbourne, Australia where the company still has its global headquarters. ANCA has offices in the UK, Germany, China, Thailand, India, Japan, Brazil and the USA as well as a comprehensive network of representatives and agents worldwide.

ANCA CNC grinders are used for manufacturing precision cutting tools and components across a diverse range of competitive industries including cutting tool manufacture, automotive, aerospace, electronics and medical.

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