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Siemens Expands Its Sinamics V20 Drive Family For Basic Applications

Siemens announced today the release of its new single-axis Sinamics V20 AC drive, frame size E, with both Low Overload (LO) and High Overload (HO) ratings.  The V20 family features easy setup and operation with excellent cost and energy efficiency.  With a power rating ranging from 1/6–40hp at 480V AC, Sinamics V20 drives are available in five frame sizes and are ideal for material handling, conveyor, pump, fan and compressor applications.Expanded Sinamics V20 Drive Family For Basic Applications | Siemens Drive Technologies

This compact drive can be connected and installed the conventional wall-mounting method or, optionally, mounted with heat sinks pushed through the enclosure wall.  Since no additional modules or add-on options are required for operation, installation time is minimized.

The integrated Basic Operator Panel (BOP) enables trouble-free commissioning and operation on-site.  Besides the universal serial interfaces that allow for easy connection to Simatic programmable logic controllers (PLCs), a Modbus interface is also included for communication with third-party controls.  Pre-built connection and application macros are used for facilitating application-specific settings.  For units with power ratings higher than 10hp, a braking resistor can be connected directly to the integrated braking chopper.

Operating the Sinamics V20 drive is just as easy as commissioning.  Parameters that have been optimized for one application can easily be transferred to other drive units using SD cards via the Basic Operator Panel or the battery-operated Parameter Loader.  The built-in display has the ability to list only those parameters changed from the factory default values rather than having to scroll through all of them.

Tailored inter-connectivity and application macros (i.e. for pumps, fans and compressors) provide the correct settings for the particular application.  The Keep Running Mode automatically adapts the V20 drive to the power supply to achieve higher availability when operated on unstable networks.  In this mode, line fluctuations are compensated for internally and error messages are acknowledged autonomously.  Thanks to enhanced cooling and coated PCBs and electronic components, the Sinamics V20 is extremely rugged, making the unit reliable even in harsh environments.

The demand-driven regulation of the motor speed also provides increased energy savings even for many applications. The Sinamics V20 is equipped with an energy-optimized control mode (ECO-mode) for increased energy efficiency.  ECO-mode automatically adapts the magnetic flux in the motor to the optimum operating point.  The DC link coupling enables efficient energy utilization of drives grouped together.  The Sinamics V20 can also be set to hibernation mode, which prolongs the service life of the motor and also reduces system component wear (i.e. pumps).  Additionally, by displaying real-time energy consumption on the operator panel display, the operator always has the drive’s energy and cost efficiencies in focus at all times.

For more information about the Sinamics V20 drive, please visit:

www.usa.siemens.com/sinamics-v20-pr

For specific product information and inquiries, call (800) 879-8079
ext. Marketing Communications or send an e-mail to: SiemensMTBUMarCom.industry@siemens.com

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KraussMaffei Berstorff Supplies KRAIBURG TPE with Advanced Extruder Control Technology

Co-rotating twin-screw compound extruder used in R&D facility to test material batches, recipes; pre-configured extrusion solution on control package monitors entire machine, providing “big data” for customer at attractive price point

Typical parts made from TPE at Kraiburg | Siemens Industry

Typical parts made from TPE at Kraiburg

KRAIBURG TPE Corporation in Duluth, Ga. is a manufacturer of custom-made thermoplastic elastomer (TPE) compounds for a variety of market applications in the automotive, medical, general industrial and myriad consumer sectors. At the Duluth facility, the product development department routinely evaluates material batches and new custom compounds for performance and customer specification viability. As an integral step in that process, KRAIBURG TPE engineers utilize sophisticated co-rotating, twin-screw extruder technology provided by KraussMaffei Berstorff, from its facility in Florence, Ky.

Owing to the substantial varieties of color, durometer and the wide-ranging performance properties required at KRAIBURG TPE, monitoring every aspect of the machine performance is critical. This includes all temperatures, speeds, pressures and torque on the extruder itself, plus an underwater pelletizer, gear pump and multiple loss-of-weight feeders used on the line.

KraussMaffei Berstorff Supplies KRAIBURG TPE with Advanced Extruder Control Technology | Siemens Industry

At a glance, the operator sees the condition of the machine in real time and can make better on-the-fly adjustments

For the latest machine installed at the KRAIBURG TPE facility, as senior application engineer at KraussMaffei Bertstorff, David Frankenberg, explains, “The lab extrusion line is used for both process and product development assessment. A key requirement was the generation of all data in real time, as part of the management system to be used, as well as the condition monitoring system needed for predictive maintenance strategies being employed.” In cooperation with the KRAIBURG TPE team and after evaluating the competitors for the control scheme, KraussMaffei turned to Siemens for assistance, as this supplier was able to bring a pre-configured and highly cost-effective solution to the requirements on this machine.

KraussMaffei Berstorff Supplies KRAIBURG TPE with Advanced Extruder Control Technology | Siemens Indusry

Siemens temp zone control system monitors all aspects of extruder, providing “big data” to the host network

As Frankenberg and his electrical engineering associate Martin Gonzalez detailed, the Siemens EXT3370 application package represented a blending of the current PLC technology and drives platform with an HMI capable of providing all graphics and multiple data screens on a single display. In addition, the system had the ability to feed the “big data” directly to the KRAIBURG TPE process data archival & analysis system, where it would reside for real-time and long-range performance evaluation by the product development, quality and process teams. All speeds, pressures, temperatures and other parameters can be instantly assessed, using set point and actual value data on the display, either at the machine HMI or a remote monitor within the KRAIBURG TPE network.

On the KraussMaffei Bertstorff machine, the control system comprises the software solution, Siemens drives and motors, the ability to monitor up to 32 separate temperature zones, touch screen technology on a 15” HMI and scalability on the drives to accept the ancillary equipment being monitored at the KRAIBURG TPE facility. In this way, a truly customized solution was devised using an entirely standard and thus highly cost-effective array of components, according to Frankenberg. As an additional benefit, he noted, the training needed was minimal, owing to the plain language on the control with no need for knowledge of high-level programming skills. Finally, all compound recipes can be easily transferred via USB for portability and security.

KraussMaffei Berstorff Supplies KRAIBURG TPE with Advanced Extruder Control Technology | Siemens Indusry

Extruder line built by KraussMaffei Berstorff in Florence, Kentucky for Kraiburg TPE

Allen Donn, product development engineer at KRAIBURG TPE, along with his team of engineers and tech specialists, evaluated the installation and commissioning of the machine at the Duluth facility. “The data transfer from the PLC into the same process data archival & analysis system that we use for our other lines at KRAIBURG TPE. A simple Excel file is generated with any parameters desired for analysis, plus we can easily exchange data between R&D and production here. The result is that our ability to utilize production machinery more efficiently has increased substantially with the use of the new KraussMaffei Bertstorff machine in our test department, as the control system gives us real-time hard data we can use to make adjustments on new recipes and entirely new materials.” KRAIBURG TPE performs extensive new compound property performance testing on its TPE formulae and the time compression realized by using the new extruder line in this “real world” R&D operation is providing substantial advantages for the compounder.

KraussMaffei Berstorff Supplies KRAIBURG TPE with Advanced Extruder Control Technology | Siemens Indusry

Various compounds are formulated at Kraiburg and test run on the KraussMaffei Berstorff extruder at the Kraiburg lab in Duluth, Georgia

KRAIBURG TPE typically runs materials in the 20-80 Shore A hardness range and, as an example, might test out a variety of adhesion grades for over-molding onto polycarbonate, nylon, or other substrates, Donn explained. “When we can pull the data from any machine in the system, adjust it, run it on the R&D machine, and then feed that data back into production, it makes a huge difference in our efficiencies.” In one instance, shortly after the KraussMaffei machine was installed, KRAIBURG TPE engineers were testing 15 compound varieties on the machine very quickly, compared to using production equipment to do that task. “I could look into the software to compare all set point and actual values, remotely, over the entire test period,” Donn noted. He added that the substantial raw material cost savings of more tests, faster results and less waste all contribute to an improved profitability for the company, as well.

For more information on this story, please contact:

KRAIBURG TPE CORPORATION
2625 North Berkeley Lake Road
Duluth, GA 30096
Phone: 678-584-5020
www.KRAIBURG-tpe.com
info-america@KRAIBURG-tpe.com
Attention: Katherine Olano

Or

KRAUSSMAFFEI GROUP USA
7095 Industrial Road
Florence, KY 41042
Phone : 859-283-0200
www.kraussmaffei.com
david.frankenberg@kraussmaffei.com
Attention : David Frankenberg

Or

SIEMENS
Digital Factory
5300 Triangle Parkway
Norcross, GA 30092
Phone : 770-871-3848
www.usa.siemens.com/plastics
mathias.radziwill@siemens.com
Attention : Mathias Radziwill

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Regenerative Drive Power Goes Underground

Unique below-ground system at Portland Water Bureau utilizes Lucid Energy power generation, Siemens motors and regenerative drives with natural water flow to create energy; will produce 1.1MW of electricity per year, enough to power 150 homes

Recently, the use of regenerative energy has ramped up quickly in American industry due largely to the advancements in drives technology. Through various mechanical components coupled with regenerative drives, energy can be captured or created and used in three ways. Namely, it can be battery-stored for subsequent use, redirected immediately to other electrical power requirements or fed back to the power company in a contract arrangement, all done without loss of host system performance, mechanical component integrity or safety issues.

Typically, regenerative power is produced by, for example, a motor turning during braking or stopping. What if the motor turned as the result of something other than an electrical power supply?

At the City of Portland (Oregon) Water Bureau, they partnered with a local firm, Lucid Energy, who provided a very unique method of power generation. The renewable energy and smart water management solution used is the supplier’s patented LucidPipe™ Power System, which enables industrial, municipal and agricultural water facilities to generate clean, reliable and low-cost energy from gravity-fed water pipeline and stream flow.

The LucidPipe™ Power System uses a unique lift-based, vertical axis spherical turbine technology to smoothly transfer the kinetic energy of the water flow to rotate the motor shaft without impeding the water flow to any great degree. Photo Credit: Sherri Kaven.

The LucidPipe™ Power System uses a unique lift-based, vertical axis spherical turbine technology to smoothly transfer the kinetic energy of the water flow to rotate the motor shaft without impeding the water flow to any great degree. Photo Credit: Sherri Kaven.

For a recent installation under the road at SW 147th Avenue and Powell Boulevard in Portland, Lucid Energy provided their system, which comprises four 42” lift-based turbines spun by the gravity-fed water flow inside the Portland Water Bureau pipeline. These turbines turn four Siemens torque motors as 50kW generators for a 200kW nameplate capacity project. The electricity generated by this system is captured and fed to the Portland General Electric (PGE) grid by four Siemens regenerative drives. In a 20-year power purchase agreement, this project will generate approximately $2 million in renewable energy capacity, to be used for development, installation and operational maintenance costs.

The project investor, Harbourton Alternative Energy, will share the revenue with the City of Portland and Portland Water Bureau to reduce the cost of water operations. Upon completion of the agreement, Portland Water Bureau has the right to purchase the system and the power produced. Since the pipeline is expected to have a lifespan of over 50 years, this project represents a mutually beneficial arrangement for the investor and the city alike.

Known as the Conduit 3 Hydroelectric Project, this system represents the first venture in the U.S. to secure a 20-year Power Purchase Agreement for renewable energy produced by in-pipe hydropower in a municipal water pipeline.

The installation of the system at SW 147th Avenue and Powell in Portland, Oregon. Photo Credit: Sherri Kaven.

The installation of the system at SW 147th Avenue and Powell in Portland, Oregon. Photo Credit: Sherri Kaven.

“For the execution of this project, we reached out to Siemens, in tandem with their solution partner in our area, Applied Motion Systems, who wrote the software for the regenerative operational protocols, connecting the hardware to the grid,” according to Lucid Energy’s director of operations, Susan Priddy. In addition to the drives and motors on this project, Siemens also provided the motion controller, transformers, circuit breakers and all power supplies. The master control cabinet is installed underground, in close proximity to the pipeline and the four LucidPipe turbines (shown in photo).

Functionally, the water being fed from reservoirs flows downhill to turn the torque motors into generators, which supply power back onto the Siemens Sinamics S120 drive system, which in turn feeds it to the electrical grid of PGE. The electricity is generated by the water flow with no other power source. The pipeline performance is unaffected and there is no environmental impact. The Lucid Energy system has been tested and certified by NSF International to meet the NSF/ANSI Standard 61 for potable water systems. The LucidPipe system extracts very little head pressure, typically 1-5 PSI, so the turbine units can be installed in sequence without disruption of the water flow. The system does not require installation in a pressure-transient zone or where extreme differential pressures are required.

Lucid Energy developed its patented lift-based, vertical axis spherical turbine technology (shown in photo) at the end of the generator’s flange to maximize the use of the water’s gravitational flow to put work back onto the motor. Units can be installed in 24”-96” diameter pipes. For this project, Lucid Energy was able to use standard motor and drive components that would typically require external power supply to control the motion of a machine, as part of its LucidPipe™ power generation system.

Aesthetically, as a collateral benefit, the entire system detailed here is located underground.

The system was final tested in February 2015 and is producing power to full expectations today. Based on subsequent performance metrics analysis, Portland Water Bureau is considering additional installations of the LucidPipe system.

Ryan Misjan and Steve Schoneger from Siemens, plus Susan Priddy from Lucid Energy and Jennifer Allen Newton from Bluehouse Consulting Group contributed to this story.

See the system in action! http://www.lucidenergy.com/how-it-works/

For more information on this story, please contact:

LUCID ENERGY
2420 NE Sandy Boulevard
Suite 203
Portland, OR 97232
Phone: 503-341-0004
www.lucidenergy.com
Attention: Gregg Semler, President & CEO

Or

SIEMENS
Digital Factory
Factory Automation
5300 Triangle Parkway
Norcross, GA 30092
Phone: 770-871-3848
www.usa.siemens.com/drives
Attention: Sandra Tigert

 

How Regenerative Drives Work

Power regeneration is the process of recovering kinetic energy created by a motor turning during stopping or braking or, as in the situation described in this story, by the natural gravitational motion of water flow, and converting that energy to electricity, then feeding it back onto the grid.

Siemens regenerative active infeed drives, as demonstrated in this story, efficiently return the energy created back into the supply system, rather than losing the energy in the form of heat or inertial load losses. The regenerative operation is combined with power quality management, improving the overall operational system efficiency. By virtually eliminating harmonics and optionally providing power factor control to compensate for poor power factor from other loads, active infeed drives provide more stable operation on the load in weak supply systems with voltage and frequency fluctuations and can actually help stabilize the supply system. Motor performance is also improved significantly with active infeed (also called active front end) regenerative drives technology.

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Machine Safety Gets You Soaring Towards Productivity & Profitability

AIT uses Siemens highly integrated solutions platform, with SIMATIC Safety PLC, Sinamics drives and Simotion motion control over the PROFINET network, to go above & beyond to improve performance & productivity for Boeing’s Dreamliner fuselage assembly process

Advanced Integration Technology (AIT) is a 20-year-old supplier of turnkey industrial automation systems for the aerospace industry.  The company’s strength centers on the design and build of complex, fully integrated manufacturing, tooling and assembly systems for commercial and military aircraft, produced by the world’s leading suppliers, including Boeing, Bombardier, EADS, British Aerospace, Lockheed Martin, Spirit AeroSystems, Vought and others.  Its reputation as an established partner to these companies is well known, despite its relative corporate youth.  AIT operates six locations in the U.S., Canada, Sweden and Spain to serve its growing customer base.

All actions in each section are controlled and monitored by Siemens SIMOTION motion controllers, SINAMICS drives, failsafe CPU, safety devices and distributed I/O, working either independently or in concert, as the production requires.

All actions in each section are controlled and monitored by Siemens SIMOTION motion controllers, SINAMICS drives, failsafe CPU, safety devices and distributed I/O, working either independently or in concert, as the production requires

On a recent project involving production of the Boeing 787 Dreamliner, AIT designed and built all final body assembly systems needed to join the major fuselage components, plus a moving production line.  Key elements in this design included the motion control system, servo drive platforms, failsafe CPUs and all distributed I/O, with the entire system communicating over a Profinet network.  In addition, the integration of comprehensive safety technology was incorporated into the standard automation on these systems.

As a prime contractor on the 787, AIT had responsibility for the final assembly and body join functions, charged with delivering a fully automated positioning and joining system.  In the end, two complete assembly systems and one positioning system were provided.  The three main sections of the fuselage are joined, with 14 positioners mounted to transport structures that move either independently or interlocked and indexed to the factory floor for stability.  Real-time positioning measurement data are logged with an integrated indoor GPS.  AIT designed the alignment and positioning systems to allow rolling them under the aircraft dollies after the sections were brought into the Boeing factory, radically reducing auxiliary equipment needs, materials handling requirements and additional positioning steps in the overall process.

Onsite at Boeing, the 14 positioning system components were moved into their respective locations near the cradle dollies and engaged to lift and move the aircraft sections.  Once the system was rigidly joined, a measurement system onboard located the airplane sections.  This information was fed to the AIT system’s software application.  From those data points, the system could then calculate how much each section (nose, tail, left and right wings) needed to move to ensure an exact fit to the adjoining section.  This precise alignment ensured a smooth and more rapid build of each aircraft’s fuselage.

In commenting on the particulars of this system’s requirements for his company, Ed Chalupa, president of AIT, explains, “We looked for a supplier with an off-the-shelf selection of automation and motion control solutions, who could offer us global support.  Our goal here was to align ourselves with a leading automation technology supplier and to utilize all current software, integrated safety and control technology advancements.  Both Boeing and AIT were keenly sensitive to lifecycle security issues in this critical area of the project.”  He further noted that it was vital the chosen supplier be able to provide comprehensive application engineering support, training on both the products and software, plus prototype and demo equipment for AIT’s use with its customer and internally, with ongoing technical support agreements, covering both the products and software updates.

After an extensive review of several global contenders, the selection was made for Siemens control system components.

Click to view -> schematic shows the independent but interconnected nature of the control platforms for each section.  The Siemens SCALANCE wireless technology is used for system switching.

Section 47 (aft fuselage) of 787 in AITs FBJ

Section 47 (aft fuselage) of 787 in AITs FBJ

The basic scheme of the motion control system implemented here comprises a Simotion D motion controller, Siemens HMI on a Windows-based PC, a SIMATIC S7 Safety PLC and fail-safe/standard I/O modules, all running on a Profinet network.  This basic architecture was then multiplied by the number of control nodes for each specific operational system in the overall production line being designed by AIT.  Each unit is capable of working independently of the others in the line.  Or, with the addition of relatively few Profinet cables and mode selctions on each unit, the final body join assembly tool is able to run as a single entity.  When running together in this latter configuration, the safety devices are likewise working coherently, providing proper response levels to all E-stop events on the line.  Each unit motion controller receives commands to perform uniform group movements with the tool as a whole via network communications from the HMI.

Specifically, the Siemens Simotion D motion controller used here controls all axis movements to accurately position and align parts.  Because AIT delivers a turnkey and dedicated system, customers have no need for further internal customization of the controller hardware or HMI panels.

Position 2 full FBJ tool

Position 2 full FBJ tool

AIT designed the overall layout of the control architecture, programmed the Simotion system with the Simatic S7 PLC, distributed I/O and integrated safety, plus provided support on the Boeing internal structure and lifecycle support requirements.

The integrated safety concept on this overall system was based upon three core principles:  increasingly layered safety architectures, greater degrees of integration between the control and safety systems, plus more use of networking, especially Industrial Ethernet and currently available motion technologies.

In operational sequence, these safety principles manifest themselves in the form of physical barriers and mechanical means such as walls, gates, door interlocks and light curtains, all designed to separate personnel from danger.  Meanwhile, the control systems, including programmable safety relays and safety PLCs, monitor operating conditions within established parameters.  Finally, safety shutdown systems such as automatic shutdown via safety PLC or manual shutdown via E-stops, offer the final protections.

FBJ showing wing trivet for wing join

FBJ showing wing trivet for wing join

Siemens engineered a safety protocol that simplified the complexity often encountered in the integration of control and safety systems.  This was achieved by reducing the issues related to different programming languages and procedures, installation and configuration requirements, maintenance procedures and human error factors.  The result for AIT and its customer Boeing was lower total cost of ownership (TCO), owing to the substantial reduction in engineering, hardware, training and spare parts needed.

With integrated safety and control, the project has a single system for standard and safe automation, with one bus and one engineering system for both standard and safety technology, which further reduces cost.  As a collateral benefit, the software solutions allow easier replication of series machines.   Likewise, faster troubleshooting and extensive diagnostics onboard reduce downtimes on the floor, with faster restart after issue resolution.  Functionally, too, this safety integration in the control system allows uniform user interfaces and data libraries, plus a reduction in the variety of control cabinets needed for the various applications.

PROFIsafe®, the first communication safety-profile meeting the IEC 61508 safety requirements, is the backbone of all fail-safe communication.  PROFIsafe® facilitates the transmission of both standard and safety-related data on a single bus cable, using either Ethernet or fieldbus protocol.   With advanced PLC and Industrial Ethernet networking technologies combined, the system safety for AIT and its customer became a production asset that protects the workers from harm and also ensures maximum availability and uptime.   Reductions in initial capital expense and field operating expense were also realized.

Final assembly of first 787

Final assembly of first 787

According to AIT engineering, SIMATIC Safety PLC brought the highest possible integration of safety and ease of designing a complex system into the automation scenario for this project.

In the field, the final assembly and body join automated assembly systems, plus positioning system provided to Boeing, are utilized to join Section 41 (forward fuselage), Sections 47/48 (aft fuselage) and Section 12 (left and right side wings) to the mid-fuselage of the 787 Dreamliner aircraft.  Two major sub-assemblies, namely the forward/aft body positioners and left/right wing positioners, are further split for transport into left- and right-hand minor sub-assemblies.

Motion Control, advanced PLC systems and industrial Ethernet networking technologies have enabled machine safety to become a production asset that not only protects workers from harm but also ensures maximum availability and uptime.

Machine Safety gives a competitive edge that goes to producers with highly integrated operations that are faster, more flexible and more responsive to changing market demands and opportunities, as AIT has shown in Boeing’s Dreamliner fuselage assembly process.

AIT designs and manufactures custom tooling and assembly equipment used to fabricate and assemble major commercial and military aircraft.  As part of its total value proposition, AIT houses over 600,000 square feet for engineering, precision metal fabrication, machining and assembly of its production systems.  The company’s equipment is typically used for assembly as well as machining of all the current aircraft structure materials, including aluminum, aluminum alloys, titanium, carbon fiber, Invar and many specialty alloys and composite substrates. 

For further information on this story, please contact:

ADVANCED INTEGRATION TECHNOLOGY (AIT)
2805 E. Plano Pkwy.
Suite 100
Plano, TX 75074
Phone:  972-423-8354
Fax:  972-423-8469
Web:  www.aint.com
Email:  ait@aint.com
Attention:  Ed Chalupa, President or Susan Hardaway, Marketing Mgr.

OR

SIEMENS INDUSTRY, INC.
MOTION CONTROL
PRODUCTION MACHINE BUSINESS
390 Kent Avenue
Elk Grove Village, IL 60007
Phone: 847-640-1595
Fax: 847-437-0784
Web:  www.usa.siemens.com/simotion
Email:  SiemensMTBUMarCom.sea@siemens.com
Attention:  John Meyer, Manager, Marketing Communications

Follow us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/siemens.dt.us or Twitter: www.twitter.com/siemens_dt_us

Siemens Industry Sector is the world’s leading supplier of innovative and environmentally friendly products, solutions and services for industrial customers. With end-to-end automation technology and industrial software, solid vertical-market expertise, and technology-based services, the sector enhances its customers’ productivity, efficiency and flexibility. With a global workforce of more than 100,000 employees, the Industry Sector comprises the Industry Automation, Drive Technologies and Customer Services Divisions as well as the Metals Technologies Business Unit. For more information, visit http://www.usa.siemens.com/industry.

The Siemens Drive Technologies Division is the world’s leading supplier of products, systems, applications, solutions and services for the entire drive train, with electrical and mechanical components. Drive Technologies serves all vertical markets in the production and process industries as well as the infrastructure/energy segment. With its products and solutions, the division enables its customers to achieve productivity, energy efficiency and reliability. For more information, visit http://www.usa.siemens.com/drivetechnologies.

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Model Turbines 
from One Mold

Energy production specialist MCE uses a simultaneous 
five-axis mill-turn center with Sinumerik 840D sl 
for producing model running wheels in one setting and thereby reducing throughput time.

MCE Maschinen- und Apparatebau GmbH CEO 
Gottfried Langthaler (right) and Buz Bozner, head of the Alzmetall Technology Center, agree: The efficiency of the Sinumerik 840D sl makes an important contribution to enabling simultaneous milling and turning in every position with the GS 1000/5-FTD.

MCE Maschinen- und Apparatebau GmbH CEO 
Gottfried Langthaler (right) and Buz Bozner, head of the Alzmetall Technology Center, agree: The efficiency of the Sinumerik 840D sl makes an important contribution to enabling simultaneous milling and turning in every position with the GS 1000/5-FTD.

MCE Maschinen- und Apparatebau GmbH 
in Linz, Austria, produces various components for large gas, steam, and water turbines, as well as for wind power stations and other segments of energy production. But before the company receives any orders for these products, realistic models must prove their efficiency, underlines MCE CEO Gottfried Langthaler: “It is therefore very important for us to be able to manufacture 
the turbine models in high quality and, at the same time, productively with a short throughput time.”

In mid-2010, the running wheels were still being milled individually on a five-axis machining center 
and then bolted or welded together. The average throughput time was six weeks. Thanks to a few technical tricks and the Sinumerik-controlled GS 1000/5-FTD from Alzmetall, which has been used 
in model production since the end of 2010, the machining expert Langthaler was able to reduce throughput time by up to one-third — to about four weeks, depending on the product. As a qualified master of mechanical engineering and design, 
he already knew before purchasing the Alzmetall machine that it would be ideal for his model production if a Francis turbine could be produced from solid brass: “I was merely skeptical that a machining center could do that. After all, we have to achieve 
a high roughing cut and smooth with maximum 
precision and surface quality.” Initial tests with the GS 1000/5-FTD revealed that the technical conditions were right. Langthaler adds: “Alzmetall 
also flexibly adapted the machining center to our needs so that we can meet 
all the requirements regarding accuracy and surface quality — 
in one setting if necessary.”

B02b_Siemens_MCE-Alzmetall copy

User-friendly CNC for milling 
and turning jobs

Because this machine must also perform turning tasks, in addition to milling tasks, at MCE, this requirement is also in the specification and is met 
by the GS 1000/5-FTD. Buz Bozner, head of the 
Technology Center at Alzmetall, explains the technical basis: “We integrated torque motors in all round axes. We therefore achieve speeds of 300 rpm in 
the c-axis.” The mill-turn center offers an enormous machining space that not even standard lathes achieve. Parts with a diameter of up to 1,000 mm can therefore be machined. A highlight of the 
GS 1000/5-FTD is that it can be turned to any round axis position and level.

The energy professionals in model construction 
have been relying on Sinumerik controllers since the mid-1990s because, according to the mechanical engineering boss Langthaler, these were always 
convincing, especially in complex five-axis machining: “The handling of Sinumerik 840D is also clear and simple on the ShopMill and ShopTurn graphical user interfaces.” The operator 
can work particularly easily and clearly when a GS 1000/5-FTD with the new Sinumerik Operate user interface 
is used. Operation and programming always have 
the same structure, regardless of whether milling or turning processes are to be programmed and set-up. The operator is also supported by graphical displays and animations. Many intelligent functions are available, which are helpful, among other things, for tool and workpiece measurement. The operation and programming of 3+2 axis machining is also supported by the integrated Cycle800 functions. Animated 
Elements simplify the explanation of functions such as selection of the direction and free running, as well as swiveling.

Another highlight of the new GS 1000/5-FTD is the Sinumerik MDynamics technology package, which 
is especially important for complex five-axis machining. Maximum surface quality and exact contour accuracy can be achieved even more rapidly. The 
key is in the new Advanced Surface intelligent path control, which contains an optimized look-ahead function and an optimized online CNC data compressor, among other things. The integrated intelligent jolt limiter relieves stress on the machine mechanics because it enables gentle acceleration and deceleration despite extreme dynamic response.

B03a_Siemens_MCE_Alzmetal_1910

Customers reap the benefits

As a specialist in single-part and small-series production for small to large workpieces, MCE is equipped to meet even extraordinary demands on-time and with top quality. By equipping its machines with state-of-the-art Siemens technology, the company 
is able to achieve high throughput times in model production and pass these advantages on to its -customers.

For more information on this story, please contact:

SIEMENS INDUSTRY, INC.
DRIVE TECHNOLOGIES –  MOTION CONTROL (MACHINE TOOL BUSINESS)
390 Kent Avenue
Elk Grove Village, IL 60007
Phone: 847-640-1595
Fax: 847-437-0784
Web:  www.usa.siemens.com/cnc
Email:  SiemensMTBUMarCom.sea@siemens.com
Attention:  John Meyer, Manager, Marketing Communication

Follow us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/SiemensCNC or Twitter:  www.twitter.com/siemens_cnc_us.

Siemens Industry Sector is the world’s leading supplier of innovative and environmentally friendly products, solutions and services for industrial customers. With end-to-end automation technology and industrial software, solid vertical-market expertise, and technology-based services, the sector enhances its customers’ productivity, efficiency and flexibility. With a global workforce of more than 100,000 employees, the Industry Sector comprises the Industry Automation, Drive Technologies and Customer Services Divisions as well as the Metals Technologies Business Unit. For more information, visit http://www.usa.siemens.com/industry.

The Siemens Drive Technologies Division is the world’s leading supplier of products, systems, applications, solutions and services for the entire drive train, with electrical and mechanical components. Drive Technologies serves all vertical markets in the production and process industries as well as the infrastructure/energy segment. With its products and solutions, the division enables its customers to achieve productivity, energy efficiency and reliability. For more information, visit http://www.usa.siemens.com/drivetechnologies.

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The Five-Year Plan That Worked

Smiths Machine answered the recession with a formula for major change

So what’s the secret to their success?

To begin with, the omission of the apostrophe from the company’s name was deliberate. Being different is in the DNA of Smiths Machine. This is a second-generation, family-owned business that found a way to grow its workforce by 70 people during the last five years That’s a 300% employment surge that mostly happened during the recession, a time when many machine shops (and for that matter, many businesses), were struggling just to hang on.

Ahead of the recession, Smiths Machine did what many machine shops were doing at the time. They were riding the wave of automotive parts production and doing seemingly fine, until the massive downturn came. The bankruptcies of the tier one automotive companies suddenly left many machine shops vulnerable to volume-based supply from overseas competition; and a once well-oiled machine tool business model now seemed unstable and uncertain. Equally uncertain was the idea of moving the business in an entirely different direction.

Manufacturing complex parts for the aerospace and defense industry, demands consistency, high-quality and precision — achieved only with Siemens CNC.

Manufacturing complex parts for the aerospace and defense industry, demands consistency, high-quality and precision — achieved only with Siemens CNC.

To be or not to be — different

Defense and aerospace part manufacturing require a different business approach altogether, says Tim Smith, vice president of Smiths Machine.

“It is specialized work that requires special approvals, log-down processes and complicated procedures,” Smith says. “The complexity is challenging. And it all starts with a different way of thinking, more of an engineering approach than a production approach.”

Smith says his company needed to build a new business model and the operations to support it. The defense and aerospace machining market is characterized by small lot counts, generally lower margins, and a very low tolerance for errors. Scrap rates thought to be nominal in the past would now be out of the question.

“You can’t make a $6,000 part and have a 30% scrap rate or even a 10% scrap rate,” explains Smith. “The emphasis is not on throughput, but on the high quality, highly precise manufacturing of very complex parts.”

Based on these three inseparable machining requirements — quality, precision and complexity — Smiths Machine set out to reach its greater potential in the machine tool market, not as a production machine shop, but as company focused on complex part manufacturing. Having achieved some early success in this new direction, the way forward for the company soon could be summed up more simply:

“The more complex the part, the more competitive we are,” says Smith.

To protect and grow this competitive advantage, the company’s leadership knew that their internal processes and technology needed to match up with the unique requirements of the defense and aerospace industries. Major investments in large, complex, five-axis machines would need to be enhanced by equally complex control capabilities. Smith recounts how a decision made previously by the company would now come into play in a profound way.

A backbone for change

Traditionally a milling and turning company, Smiths Machine first teamed up with DMG and Siemens in the year 2000 to establish their singular machine tool platform. This brought about a synergistic approach to complex milling and turning; an advantage that took on greater significance when the company decided to focus on the defense and aerospace markets later in the decade.

“Siemens controls were available on DMG milling and turning machines, and that was a natural fit for us,” Smith recalls. The DMG / Siemens platform has enabled Smiths Machine to establish and maintain a high level of operational proficiency. The central advantage here, Smith says, has been the ability to invest, train and keep his people moving forward based on a stable technology platform.

“The technology and the people using it are the backbone of our organization,” Smith asserts. “Even with 25 machines, we can share knowledge between the milling and the turning machines. The common control is a Siemens Sinumerik 840D sl. Our technology purchases are based on where we want to be in ten years, not on a workforce that is fractionally trained and a platform that can rapidly deteriorate due to a change in market condition or a change in employment condition.”

Smith says an example of this singular platform advantage is the control’s similarity across milling and turning operations. “All controls are customized to a certain extent,” Smith acknowledges. “But unlike Siemens, many other control series are individually customized so that the keyboard layout will be different from machine to machine. The Sinumerik 840D sl CNC is consistent. So when you train your operators, you can say, here’s the jog button, here’s the axes button, here’s your alarm button and your offset button. And this level of consistency extends to a graphical interface that really complements how we teach and learn.”

Teaching and learning are closely held values within an organization that uses a breadth of visual techniques to foster education, efficient information sharing, and quality control.

“We are a very visual company,” Smith says. “We use a lot of colors and we buy a lot of printer toner. Our parts inventory uses color-coded tags and the same is true across our production. We use yellows and blues and reds for consistent instruction. And the Siemens 840D sl control uses the same approach. You are guided visually for such things as axis direction, approach point, final depth and other variables inside a cycle. And this is true from control to control, for milling and turning.”

Smith says visually guided information flow is characteristic of today’s complex range of next-generation electronic communications, because this speeds understanding and information sharing. Whether for a smart phone or a CNC, graphically guided interfaces enable rapid learning and proficiency, a fact that has been well leveraged by the 840D control interface design.

Smiths Machine’s plan for stable growth started with its investment in a stable CNC platform: The steady progression of a stable machine / control platform has enabled the company’s similarly growing workforce to build on existing knowledge, rather than learn new and different versions every few years.

Smiths Machine’s plan for stable growth started with its investment in a stable CNC platform: The steady progression of a stable machine / control platform has enabled the company’s similarly growing workforce to build on existing knowledge, rather than learn new and different versions every few years.

New angles on programming

Gerhard Hetzler, engineering manager at Smiths Machine, has experienced firsthand how the company’s singular platform approach has brought continuity to such manufacturing functions as post, machine simulation, NC code, and control functionality.

While the Siemens 840D sl control has evolved in significant ways over the years, Hetzler says these changes have served only to accelerate the performance of the programmers and operators, rather than impede them with new and different procedures. The control platform has also given Smiths Machine the freedom to create custom cycles that can be copied and shared from control-to-control, and so machine-to-machine.

“I’ll give you an example,” says Hetzler. “To catch occasional entry errors on the tool management side, we created a cycle that checks the length of the tool and within a specific tolerance. So within in a matter of milliseconds, the control compares that value to what was entered in the tool management side, and if the tolerance is exceeded by 2mm, the control immediately stops the machine.”

Hetzler says another advantage resulting out of the DMG and Siemens relationship is the continued simplification of complex cutting operations, especially in the area of angular milling heads.

CS_SmithsMachine-2

“Siemens has come a very long way to improve the cycles and support related to milling heads,” Hetzler says. “Aerospace requires a lot more use of angular milling. Even a five-axis approach can’t do it. You need an angular milling head. I would put this on the top of my list of the advantages DMG and Siemens have developed. And this relates to another important development, Siemens NX.”

NX as in next

Siemens NX software integrates CAD, CAE and CAM for faster part manufacturing, encompassing all areas of tooling, machining and quality inspection. NX has become integral to Smiths Machine’s CNC platform, because it supports part planning through manufacturing, with the prevention of errors and related costs.

“Our ability to develop all of our own post-processors in house is supported by Siemens NX,” Hetzler explains. “We setup our angular milling heads in NX, so we can post the G-code before we even send it out to the machine.”

An early introduction to the power of NX came when the company found that it needed to write code to produce an especially challenging aerospace landing gear. The code took six-weeks to manually program. This was before the company learned that it could do the same task in nine days using NX.

“Siemens knows five-axis machining and NX is a Siemens product that leverages five-axis,” Hetzler says. “As an example, we can do three-plus-two axes work in NX. There is a cycle for that called Cycle 800. So when NX outputs the NC code, the machine then also understands it. Other control brands will have a cycle that can be made to work, but they are a lot more problematic. We are talking about managing the change of plane, a concept that has been around for a long time and was always problematic to do. Now Cycle 800 in NX does it all for you.”

Hetzler says Cycle 800 makes programming the change of plane easier, faster, and with higher accuracy than traditionally calculated methods. “We would normally round off after the third or fourth decimal,” he recalls. “Now the control calculates to nine decimals. When you start talking microns, especially in the aerospace industry, it makes a huge difference. And this difference has been fully implemented by DMG. They have invested a lot of time and money to make sure from their side that Siemens NX and Cycle 800 work 100% of the time.”

The Cycle 800 function within Siemens NX supports the programming of 2-1/2 axis and 3D milling throughout the rotation of all X-Y-Z planes, while maintaining a zero offset. Functions include automatic shifting of zero offset, tool length and radius compensation in rotated planes, compensation of machine geometry, and all machining cycles can be used.

The Cycle 800 function within Siemens NX supports the programming of 2-1/2 axis and 3D milling throughout the rotation of all X-Y-Z planes, while maintaining a zero offset. Functions include automatic shifting of zero offset, tool length and radius compensation in rotated planes, compensation of machine geometry, and all machining cycles can be used.

CS_SmithsMachine-3a

 

Please forward all inquiries to:

SIEMENS INDUSTRY, INC.
DRIVE TECHNOLOGIES
MOTION CONTROL
MACHINE TOOL BUSINESS
390 Kent Avenue
Elk Grove Village, IL 60007
Phone: 847-640-1595
Fax: 847-437-0784
Web:  www.usa.siemens.com/cnc4you
Email:  SiemensMTBUMarCom.sea@siemens.com
Attention:  John Meyer, Manager, Marketing Communication

Follow us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/SiemensCNC or Twitter:  www.twitter.com/siemens_cnc_us.

Siemens Industry Sector is the world’s leading supplier of innovative and environmentally friendly products, solutions and services for industrial customers. With end-to-end automation technology and industrial software, solid vertical-market expertise, and technology-based services, the sector enhances its customers’ productivity, efficiency and flexibility. With a global workforce of more than 100,000 employees, the Industry Sector comprises the Industry Automation, Drive Technologies and Customer Services Divisions as well as the Metals Technologies Business Unit. For more information, visit http://www.usa.siemens.com/industry.

The Siemens Drive Technologies Division is the world’s leading supplier of products, systems, applications, solutions and services for the entire drive train, with electrical and mechanical components. Drive Technologies serves all vertical markets in the production and process industries as well as the infrastructure/energy segment. With its products and solutions, the division enables its customers to achieve productivity, energy efficiency and reliability. For more information, visit http://www.usa.siemens.com/drivetechnologies.

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Retrofitting for success

Major Tool & Machine, Inc. retrofitted two of their machining centers in 2010 changing to a CNC technology platform that was completely new to the company. Ten more such large-scale retrofits have followed, bringing increased enthusiasm, momentum and productivity.

Major Tool & Machine has been on track to retrofit over a dozen of its giant milling and turning machines within just two years, all supported by a new Siemens CNC platform. MTM’s management says the process has been an empowering experience for the company.

Major Tool & Machine has been on track to retrofit over a dozen of its giant milling and turning machines within just two years, all supported by a new Siemens CNC platform. MTM’s management says the process has been an empowering experience for the company.

CNC upgrade enhances performance and precision

Major Tool & Machine (MTM) is a large job shop, producing precision milled and turned hardware throughout the company’s 500,000 square foot Indiana facility. Performance is essential, because MTM contracts with aerospace, energy, nuclear and defense companies on many mission-critical, one-off projects. Owner and CEO Steve Weyreter will tell you openly, MTM is more competitive by way of a significant CNC technology change, starting with an aggressive retrofit strategy.

Günther Zimmermann, CNC Controls Engineer at MTM, says the company’s retrofit program and the decision to change to the Siemens SINUMERIK CNC platform have brought a new enthusiasm and momentum to the company. Over the last two years the change has also brought significant time and cost reductions, especially in the areas of programming, maintenance engineering, and machine operations.

“The initial goal in early 2010 was to retrofit two Cincinnati U5 Gantry machines,” Zimmermann recounts. “We evaluated two CNC technology platforms and after considerable analysis our CEO Steve Weyreter announced that Siemens would best support the company’s future.”

The decision to reduce costs by moving to a single CNC platform was the least difficult decision for the company to make, Zimmermann explains. The larger challenge for MTM was the integration of a new CNC technology platform that was new to the company.

Bill Henderson, MTM’s manager of large machining and maintenance, agrees that the decision to change to a Siemens CNC platform integrated with advanced part and tool probing was critical, because the shop manages constant changeovers from one complex job to the next, making setup times a critical time/cost constraint for the company. Another big advantage is the increased flexibility by only having to train machinists and maintenance personnel on one type of control.

Henderson went on to say “the decision to change to a new control has signaled higher expectations for the company, along with new challenges for those who program, operate and maintain the company’s big machines.

Naturally, there’s a resistance to change,” Henderson says. “People are comfortable with what they normally run, but after our discussions with the people on the plant floor, they understood the overall objective. Our retrofit program is not finished, yet it’s already showing tremendous benefits.”

An advantage MTM gained by its retrofit strategy has been the ability to interchange heads and rotary tables from machine to machine. Easy-to- use head storage and tool management programming provided by the Siemens CNC platform support the new interchange capability.

An advantage MTM gained by its retrofit strategy has been the ability to interchange heads and rotary tables from machine to machine. Easy-to- use head storage and tool management programming provided by the Siemens CNC platform support the new interchange capability.

Retrofitter Doug Huber says having Siemens as a new CNC technology partner has made a difference for Major Tool & Machine, but it’s also been an evolutionary uplift for his own retrofitting company, Indiana Automation.

“Indiana Automation has increasingly retrofit using Siemens controls in recent years, Huber explains. “On a retrofit, we always try to exceed what the original machine could do, and that’s just kind of inherent when you put on a Siemens 840D. Major Tool’s first retrofits were the Cincinnati U5 machines, a bridge model and two gantry models. These are five-axis machines and five-axis is the 840D’s forte. The processing power of the control is so much better, that it just whips through the blocks faster. So right off, cycle time is a major performance enhancement.”

Huber says something else happened this time. As his firm finished retrofitting the first three giant machines with Siemens five-axis controls, drives and motors, the reaction within the company was not just that the machines were now predictably more efficient, but that they performed as very different machines. A new advantage is the ability to interchange machining heads from machine-to-machine, and all driven by the Siemens CNC platform.

Central to MTM’s retrofit program has been the Siemens SINUMERIK 840D sl control, which features the SINUMERIK Operate interface. The highly intuitive interface enables both programmers and operators to easily capitalize on the broad capabilities of the control.

Central to MTM’s retrofit program has been the Siemens SINUMERIK 840D sl control, which features the SINUMERIK Operate interface. The highly intuitive interface enables both programmers and operators to easily capitalize on the broad capabilities of the control.

“On many of the U5 machines, the axes come off with the heads,” Huber explains, “and we rebuilt these machines to accept any one of three different heads. That’s one of Major Tool’s key strategies. They insist on having flexible machine capabilities, so that they can run all kinds of different parts. They have straight heads for serious metal cutting, contour heads for five-axis work and finesse work. They have 90-degree heads for more flexibility than a straight head, but it’s also not as fragile as the contour head. And they wanted to interchange all of these heads to automatically go pick up a head out of the shuttle and, on the fly, reconfigure the axes and the zero positions. To do this, the compensation tables all had to be updated. Everything needed to be done with the macro program so that each head came on ready to run.”

The interchangeable head strategy was a challenge, Huber says, because the machines were not originally capable of sharing heads. But with support from Siemens, the strategy has worked, including the ability to interchange rotary tables as well as heads. “Each head or rotary table has a configuration file that has all the settings and compensations and travels with it from machine to machine. So now when you mount that head the control just runs the configuration file that goes with it and its all set up for you. We also incorporated Siemens Tool Management for each machine’s 60-pocket tool chain. We used the feature on these machines to manage all the different tooling MTM uses, both in the automatic tool changer as well as the ones manually loaded.”

Huber says, “MTM’s ability to smoothly transition to more advanced CNC is largely due to the HMI’s ease of use. The Operate interface is a huge help to us and to Major Tool. The HMI helps make better parts. And it didn’t take very long for the operators to fall in love with it.”

Programming as easy as 1-2-3: Using the SINUMERIK Operate interface, a machinist can turn on coolant flow by 1) pressing Cycle Stop to stop the machine, 2) Coolant On, and 3) Restart.

Programming as easy as 1-2-3: Using the SINUMERIK Operate interface, a machinist can turn on coolant flow by 1) pressing Cycle Stop to stop the machine, 2) Coolant On, and 3) Restart.

“I had never used a Siemens control before,” admits MTM machinist Mike Burthay. “I have extensive knowledge of G-code and CNC controls and I would say the Siemens 840D sl with the Operate interface is the easiest one I’ve ever run. It’s user friendly, that’s exactly the words for it.”

Burthay reports several ways in which the Siemens SINUMERIK Operate interface has made his life easier. “There’s not as much G-code,” he says. “The control does it all for you as long as you put in the parameters as to size, length, width. Then once you’re in Job Mode, there’s a screen where you can tool change or jog the machine around to certain positions, or turn the spindle on, turn the coolant on, anything that traditionally required G-code. So now you can push a cycle stop button to pause the machine, enter a change such as turning coolant on, then restart the program.

“Another function I love is Block Search, which allows me to start or restart right in the middle of a program. Say you’re finishing a pocket and you have to run the tool two or three times to get a tight tolerance, I can enter in a line number and hit Block Search, the control picks up every line before that, restarts the spindle and everything for you.”

Burthay says the Siemens control also enables him to program parts right on the machine whenever necessary, using a simple yet robust program called ShopMill. “I can go into ShopMill, type in some parameters and it will kick out that G-code program for me automatically. Say I want to drill a hole two inches deep. I open ShopMill, pick my tool, tell it the depth and these steps are all interactive on the screen. It even shows me 3D motion images of the tool path, confirms the drill going down as expected into the part. So I hit go and it puts a drill cycle into the program for me.”

Programmed for collaborative growth

Lead Programmer, Tim Hayden, has from the beginning conducted all processor setups for the newly retrofitted machines. Hayden says integrating the Siemens CNC platform has been an empowering experience he had not expected, given the fact that he had never before set up a post processor to run a Siemens control, nor had he ever before operated a Siemens control.

“Now, when I look at the Siemens control, I think man, it would have been so much better to have had it all along,” Hayden says, “because the other control I’ve been using is just a lot more cryptic. The Siemens control with the SINUMERIK Operate interface is more powerful for writing macros and the language seems modern, whereas the other control seems like it is still based on an old FORTRAN type language.”

Work offsets for compound angles can be scaled and rotated using the Frames function of the Siemens SINUMERIK Operate interface. Many advanced machining operations can be managed simply, without the use of time-intensive manual G-code programming.

Work offsets for compound angles can be scaled and rotated using the Frames function of the Siemens SINUMERIK Operate interface. Many advanced machining operations can be managed simply, without the use of time-intensive manual G-code programming.

Hayden points to the Frames coordinate and offset programming function of the Siemens interface as an example of improved programming convenience.

“We do a lot of work on compound angles,” Hayden explains, “and with the Siemens Frames function, you can scale and rotate your coordinate system on the control, just plug it in with your work offsets. Whereas, on the other control you will see a G54 request, you’ve got to enter G-code. You can’t just plug it into your work offsets like you can with the Siemens control.”

Hayden says the SINUMERIK Operate interface brings greater programming flexibility. The HMI enables him to enter G-code using a comparatively more advanced manual data entry (MDI) function; however the HMI has all but eliminated the need for G-code entry by way of its intuitive design and evolved capabilities.

Another example of such HMI evolution is in the area of data management.

“When we post a program, we no longer have to use a G-code based MDI,” Hayden explains. “We no longer need to type in T= and enter a nine digit number and then enter M6 to make a tool change. With the Operate HMI, you pick your tool off a screen and hit cycle start. It’s just as easy to program going to a position. Instead of doing things the old way by typing G0X0Y0Z0 into the MDI, you open the Operate interface, click position, then click how you want to wrap it and then you just type the numbers into those fields. So it’s a lot more user friendly.”

Hayden says the Siemens CNC platform has supported greater collaboration at MTM between him and the machinists, and this is helping the company find ways to increase performance and efficiency. He agrees with his coworkers’ assessments that shorter setup times and greater operator freedom are making a significant difference.

“One of our production bottlenecks has been programming,” Hayden says. “The machinists that run our machines are professionals, they’re not button pushers, and with the SINUMERIK Operate interface, we can now rely on them to control and program certain parts right on their machines, while we programmers work on the more complex projects.”

“Siemens was the best fit for all of us,” Hayden concludes. “Siemens CNC is set up as an open control, and with that kind of flexibility, it seems anything is possible.”

For more information on Siemens SINUMERIK CNC, visit www.usa.siemens.com/cnc.

For specific product information and inquiries, call (800) 879-8079 ext. Marketing Communications or send an e-mail to: SiemensMTBUMarCom.industry@siemens.com.

Follow us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/SiemensCNC or Twitter: www.twitter.com/siemens_cnc_us.

Siemens Industry Sector is the world’s leading supplier of innovative and environmentally friendly products, solutions and services for industrial customers. With end-to-end automation technology and industrial software, solid vertical-market expertise, and technology-based services, the sector enhances its customers’ productivity, efficiency and flexibility. With a global workforce of more than 100,000 employees, the Industry Sector comprises the Industry Automation, Drive Technologies and Customer Services Divisions as well as the Metals Technologies Business Unit. For more information, visit http://www.usa.siemens.com/industry.

The Siemens Drive Technologies Division is the world’s leading supplier of products, systems, applications, solutions and services for the entire drive train, with electrical and mechanical components. Drive Technologies serves all vertical markets in the production and process industries as well as the infrastructure/energy segment. With its products and solutions, the division enables its customers to achieve productivity, energy efficiency and reliability. For more information, visit http://www.usa.siemens.com/drivetechnologies.

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Easy CNC – the easy-to-use app from Siemens

siemens_easy_cnc_app

Now for iOS and Android!

You asked and we listened.  Our popular Easy CNC app is now available for Android devices.  Easy CNC contains all the current training manuals for Siemens Sinumerik CNCs and will ensure that you always have the latest updates.

With no more heavy manuals to carry, you have access to over 4,000 pages of vital CNC instruction and content.  In addition, a handy G-code compatibility tool lets you quickly find compatible codes for Siemens and ISO G-codes.  The glossary feature is your reference guide to CNC terminology, and web-links to service, support and CNC social media feeds open the door to our online user community.  Don’t wait – download the Easy CNC app for iPhone, iPad and Android devices for free.

To download Easy CNC to your mobile device, visit:  http://www.usa.siemens.com/cnc-apps

For specific product information and inquiries, call (800) 879-8079 ext. Marketing Communications or send an e-mail to: SiemensMTBUMarCom.industry@siemens.com.

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The Siemens Industry Sector is the world’s leading supplier of innovative and environmentally friendly automation and drive technology, industrial software and technology-based services. The Sector’s comprehensive portfolio covers the entire industrial value chain, from product design, engineering and production to services. Siemens enhances its customers’ productivity, efficiency, and flexibility in a wide variety of different industries. With a global workforce of more than 100,000 employees, the Industry Sector comprises the Divisions Industry Automation, Drive Technologies and Customer Services as well as the Business Unit Metals Technologies.

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CNC IT-Integration Software for Machine Tools To Include New Applications

Siemens has added new applications to its "Sinumerik Integrate for production" software  suite for networking machine tools with production-level IT systems.

Siemens has added new applications to its “Sinumerik Integrate for production” software
suite for networking machine tools with production-level IT systems.

  • New applications for “Sinumerik Integrate for production”
  • Improved networking of machine tools with production-level IT
  • Access MyData for reading and writing NC and PLC data
  • Manage MyMaintenance for effective maintenance management

Siemens has added new applications to its “Sinumerik Integrate for production” software suite for networking machine tools with production-level IT systems. The new release now includes Manage MyMaintenance (MMM), an effective maintenance-tasks management system, and Access MyData (AMD), a set of open interfaces that now allows direct access to machine and process data.

Access MyData offers an interface to access machine and process data of machine tools controlled by the Sinumerik 840D sl CNC. To allow data communication, the machine tool is directly connected to the Sinumerik Integrate server at the customer’s site.
AMD Basic is available free-of-charge and enables the direct reading and writing of NC and PLC data from the Integrate application server. Purchasing extensions to AMD Basic allows machine tool data to be processed and NC part programs transferred via a file transfer interface.

Manage MyMaintenance enables small and medium-sized companies to enter the world of maintenance management without any additional investment. MMM automatically instructs the user, as soon as a new maintenance date is scheduled for a machine. The time and tasks to be performed are presented in a clearly laid out list.
Self-explanatory color-coding indicates which measure is overdue and which has
not yet reached its deadline. A number of maintenance tasks can be defined and intervals specified. The software is easily installed via the Sinumerik Operate graphical user interface without any programming effort.

Background information:

The Sinumerik Integrate for production software suite includes applications for simple management of machine tools and part programs, transparent recording of machine states and production data, as well as the remote maintenance of machines installed
all over the world.

For specific product information and inquiries, call (800) 879-8079 ext. Marketing Communications or send an e-mail to: SiemensMTBUMarCom.industry@siemens.com.

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The Siemens Industry Sector is the world’s leading supplier of innovative and environmentally friendly automation and drive technology, industrial software and technology-based services. The Sector’s comprehensive portfolio covers the entire industrial value chain, from product design, engineering and production to services. Siemens enhances its customers’ productivity, efficiency, and flexibility in a wide variety of different industries. With a global workforce of more than 100,000 employees, the Industry Sector comprises the Divisions Industry Automation, Drive Technologies and Customer Services as well as the Business Unit Metals Technologies.

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New Generation of Operator Panels For High-End CNC Applications

The Sinumerik blackline panels from the Siemens are a new generation of operator panels  for the Sinumerik 840D sl CNC system and offer new options for machine tool operation.

The Sinumerik blackline panels from the Siemens are a new generation of operator panels
for the Sinumerik 840D sl CNC system and offer new options for machine tool operation.

  • Robust and durable capacitive touchscreen operator panels
  • 40% energy savings compared to conventional neon lamps
  • Liquid and dust resistant, ideal for harsh conditions

The Sinumerik blackline panels OP 015 black and OP 019 black are a new generation of operator panels for the Sinumerik 840D sl CNC system and offer new options for machine operation. The inductive sensor technology enables rapid interaction with the user interface even when the operator is wearing gloves. Similarly, it prevents incorrect entries, for example caused by the heel of the operator‘s hand.

The 19-inch display of the OP 019 black can show all the entries made in widescreen format at a glance. The OP 015 black also features an alphanumerical keypad on the right that can be operated via touch control. This feature means that the 15-inch display is not restricted by the superimposed keypad during data entry, which ensures clear and efficient operation. Both blackline panels also have an integrated glass panel on the front side and are designed with IP65 (OP 019 black) and IP66 (OP 015 black) degrees of protection. They are resistant to liquids and dust and can be operated even under harsh industrial conditions. An integrated key lock helps safeguard against operating errors. The operator panel can provide a basic machine display, with three or four channels showing up to 13 axes.

The blackline panels also feature durable LED background lighting, providing 40 percent energy-savings compared to conventional neon lamps.

In combination with the Sinumerik 840D sl control, for use on high-end milling, turning, grinding and laser cutting machine tools, the blackline panels can be used as an operating and programming station for aerospace composite machining, power generation and medical part manufacturing, in addition to tool- and mold-making, rotary indexing machines and in shopfloor manufacturing.

For specific product information and inquiries, call (800) 879-8079
ext. Marketing Communications or send an e-mail to: SiemensMTBUMarCom.industry@siemens.com

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The Siemens Industry Sector is the world’s leading supplier of innovative and environmentally friendly automation and drive technology, industrial software and technology-based services. The Sector’s comprehensive portfolio covers the entire industrial value chain, from product design, engineering and production to services. Siemens enhances its customers’ productivity, efficiency, and flexibility in a wide variety of different industries. With a global workforce of more than 100,000 employees, the Industry Sector comprises the Divisions Industry Automation, Drive Technologies and Customer Services as well as the Business Unit Metals Technologies.

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