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350°F ELECTRIC BENCH OVEN FROM GRIEVE

No. 991 is an electrically-heated 350°F (~177°C) bench oven from Grieve, currently used for heating parts, including those with emissions of flammable solvents. Workspace dimensions are 28” wide x 24” deep x 18” high.  4KW are installed in Nichrome wire elements to heat the workload.

This Grieve bench oven features 2” insulated walls, leg support stand, Type 304, 2B finish stainless steel interior and exterior of brushed #4 stainless steel.  Two oven shelves are also included.

Since flammable solvents are handled in No. 991, a powered forced exhauster with powered forced airflow safety switch to shut down heat if there is an exhauster failure, as well as a purge timer to allow the oven to exhaust four volumes of fresh air prior to turning on the heat source are all onboard.

For more information, please contact: THE GRIEVE CORPORATION,   Web: www.grievecorp.com. Email: sales@grievecorp.com. Attention: Frank Calabrese.

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Advanced Machine & Engineering Has Reasons To Breathe Easy

Using Stotz air gages to validate spindle interface components, this leading supplier keeps quality on highest levels; every part, every time

Stotz USA, LLC, is a leader in air gaging technology, products and quality gaging system integration.  According to company president, Chris Koehn, Stotz has achieved that goal by a variety of means, not the least of which has been the loyalty of good customers, who appreciate the value Stotz products brings to theirs.  One of those customers is also a longtime friend of Koehn’s and he can say that with complete honesty, because he worked there, long ago.

Advanced Machine & Engineering (AME) of Rockford, Illinois is a world player in high-quality machine tool spindle interface components.  As part of the Goellner, Inc. Group, AME enjoys a reputation throughout the machine tool industry for manufacturing the finest power drawbars, spindle shafts, guide bushings, locknuts, hydraulic sleeves, expansion gibs and more.  AME components, through their own branded products and those of their brother companies such as OTT Jakob, Spieth and Tschudin & Heid, as well as their “other brother” Hennig, itself a world leader in chip conveyor and machine protection systems, are found on nearly every major machine tool brand.

AME was a customer of Stotz before Chris Koehn ever came to work at the air gaging company.  Today, these two market leaders maintain a great working relationship, for all the right reasons.  AME demands the highest level of quality in their machining and finishing departments and Stotz air gaging systems facilitate the accomplishment of that goal, every day, according to AME Service Manager, Greg Hobbs.  “Air gaging is the only technology we’ve found that’s accurate enough to check the machine tooling and especially the spindle tapers we produce here.  That’s a fact.  In the past, we’d use hard gages and we still use them, but only for certain OD checks.  We’d blue up the tapers, insert them, give them a good twist and do our inspections.  Way too much inconsistency.  Today, with sophisticated HSK tooling, this method is too hit or miss to be reliable.  Air gaging provides dead stops on the test stand and the documentation is unbeatable for validation on the straightness, surface finish and taper angles.  Plus, the Stotz system allows us to upload all the data on every part, so we have our favorite word…documentation…for every part we produce.”

Hobbs also commented on the user-friendliness of the Stotz air column.  When the program is first input into the column for a part in the AME grinding department, for example, the Stotz column essentially becomes a PLC, providing hard data via the Ethernet connections to the host data base.  In this manner, every parameter of every part is documented and recorded.  In a classic example of the law of unintended consequences, this process is not only used on the parts run, it’s also used for calibrating the AME machines, in a predictive maintenance function.

At AME, various testing of machined spindle interface and other components is performed both at the machines in the grinding department, in a temperature-controlled 72° environment, plus in the company’s totally environment-controlled in-house testing department, supervised by the company’s Director of Quality, Brad Patterson.  He confirmed Greg Hobbs’ observation that numerous other technologies have been investigated over the years for quality checking at AME and that air gaging has been found to be the best and most reliable for this company’s applications, particularly ID dimensions and configuration.  Patterson also observed, “The sophistication of the Stotz air column is unmatched in the industry.  We get all the data required and we get it in exactly the fashion needed to support our customers.  Repeatable results and elimination of error, every time.  Plus, the set-up is much faster than on our laser mics, which can’t be used for ID measurement.”  Patterson further noted that the replacement of the bluing technique, one he termed a “black art,” with air gaging has brought and keeps AME up to the most current industry standards for quality evaluation.

The typical Stotz air column found here is the Model MSG, with four pneumatic channels or ten LVDT channels operating simultaneously, pneumatic length measuring, user specific programming up to 18 programs per column, full statistical analysis and full data transfer capability within the host network.  All info is fed into the AME host computer by serial number, so any job can be quickly retrieved, while historical records on any part produced can be easily called up for evaluation, deviation claims or to dovetail with a customer’s internal quality protocols.

Typically, as AME’s Grinding Supervisor, Sam Schubert, explains, the finished product will rest for 24 hours of soaking, allowing the diameters to normalize.  Though statistically predictable for most metal materials, thermal expansion can cause off-normal readings to occur.  For checking certain bearing journals or spindle shafts, snap gages are set to accommodate size measurements down to the twenty millionths (0.000020”) range.  The acceptable diameter tolerances for most AME products measured are in the 1-2 tenths (0.0001-0.0002”) range.

In cases where new masters are made for setting control values, those values are preset offline and programmed into the air column’s software, according to Greg Hobbs.  Stotz typically performs this function for the customer in a remote manner over the Internet, through a proprietary IP address.

Among the many products finished in this grinding department are CAT/ISO 40 taper spindles, HSK test arbors, HSK grind quills, HSK steep taper milling tools and more.  Often, older and worn spindle shafts are reverse engineered by AME for retrofits and reman’s.  Even in these cases, air gaging is used to evaluate the finish process on the ID taper, as this versatile technology is easily adapted to such applications, according to AME personnel.

Sam Schubert expanded on the use of Stotz air gaging at AME.

“We have a full and very expensive inventory of hard gages with state-of-the-art indicators attached.  But the air gages can do so much more.  We use them for set-up on the grinding machines and they save us hours, every week.  When you run the number of jobs we do here, that translates into substantial, additional work product and therefore more revenue for the company.  In terms of reliability, some of the Stotz air gages we run here have been at AME since we began using the technology, nearly ten years ago now.”  Schubert also noted the air gaging set-ups on the grinders dramatically reduce the time to first part in his department’s operation.

On one major spindle shaft project for an Asian machine tool builder, who was looking for a local source of supply in America, Schubert notes, AME was confronted with an unusually large quantity run, where tool degradation during the run would normally impact the production at some point.  After an initial batch was produced, the machine builder claimed that everything but the taper was satisfactory.  Quite surprised by this claim, AME checked all the documentation and determined that the customer’s test unit was actually out of spec, in a case where the error was repeated consistently and thus overlooked.  In the end, the AME products were deemed better than perfect, in that instance.

Sam Schubert cites a useful analogy here.  “The documentation we can produce from the air gaging procedure is like a birth certificate on every unit we make.  All our spindle shafts for customers, for example, can be viewed as a series of genetically identical twins to each other and we’re providing the documentation of their DNA.”  Quite a family.

As evidence of their commitment to this technology, Schubert notes that AME is now purchasing air gaging fixtures for all new customer applications.  This quality spindle interface manufacturer aims to “keep breathing easy” in their process and product validation, as a result.

“Stotz has been a leader in gaging technology for almost 60 years.  We are constantly striving to improve our designs and develop new products to solidify our position as a leader in measuring technology.  The Stotz customer base consists of the top manufacturers and suppliers in the machine tool, automotive, aerospace and medical industries,” according to company president, Chris Koehn.

Harold Goellner, Vice President at AME, also contributed to this article.

For more information: STOTZ USA, LLC Email:  chris@stotz-usa.com Attention:  Chris Koehn, President

All photos kindly supplied by Bill Edmundson of Advanced Machine & Engineering

Release:  STOTZ USA, LLC

Date:  January 20, 2010

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Crowning: A Cheap Fix for Noise Reduction and Misalignment Problems and Applications On Gears

Noisy gear trains have been a common problem for gear designers for a long time. With the demands for smaller gearboxes transmitting more power at higher rpm and incumbent demands for greater efficiency, gear engineers are always searching for new ways to reduce vibration and limit noise, without increasing costs.

Some popular solutions to the noisy gear problem include enlarging the pinion to reduce undercut, using Phenolic, Delrin or other noise-absorbing products, where possible, or changing to a helical gear train.  Other methods include tightening specifications to insure greater gear quality or redesigning the acoustical absorption characteristics of the gearbox.  Occasionally, experimentation with gear ratios can limit harmonic frequency amplification, which otherwise can cause a gearbox to amplify noise like a finely tuned stereo system.  The engineer can also study material and hardness requirements, so that modifications may be made to minimize heat treatment distortion or possibly eliminate the need for heat treatment entirely.

Particular attention must also be paid to gear geometry to insure maximum contact.

Another approach to the gear noise problem that yields good results is crowning or barreling of the teeth. This technique involves changing the chordal thickness of the tooth along its axis. This modification eliminates end bearing by offering a contact bearing in the center of the gear.

A second benefit of the crowning approach to gear cutting is the minimization of misalignment problems, caused by inaccurate machining of the casting, housing, shafting, gearboxes or bearing journals. Crowning can also reduce lead problems in the gears themselves, which causes the gears to wear unevenly and bind because of eccentricities and position errors.  Obviously, a gear with a center contact is less affected by discrepant manufacturing or design; furthermore, one can reduce the backlash requirements and allow the gears to wear in rather than wear out.

Shaving is a secondary gear finishing operation done after rough hobbing or shaping to create the desired crown. Crown shaving has long been a popular method, especially in manufacturing coarse pitch gears. With the recent evolution of gear equipment capable of crowning while cutting, the need for shaving just to achieve a crown has been eliminated.

Two variations of the crown shaving method will produce a gear to compensate for off-lead or misalignment conditions.

One approach produces a crown by rocking the table during the reciprocation of work and cutter. The degree of crown is readily changed by this method. The other approach is plunge feeding, which requires dressing the shaving cutter to the desired crown. Generally, it is faster to plunge feed, but the technique can subject the cutter to greater wear.  Of course, it is more difficult to change the crown, provided one starts with good quality gears.  Shaving improves the quality of profile and reduces error in the gear tooth, through the cutting and burnishing action of the cutters.

The crown form can be produced on gear teeth in several other ways. One method is to shape the gear by use of a crown cam in the shaper back-off mechanism. The proper radius of the gear is calculated by using the amount of crown on the flank and the pressure angle of the gear.  Unfortunately, the blocks, while not complex, tend to be expensive.

The advent of the latest generation of gear equipment has made two methods of crowning while hobbing popular. Both methods produce crowns by increasing and decreasing the center distance of cutter to workpiece. The first method utilizes physical copying of a template by a hydrocopying or mechanical following device. This allows taper hobbing or even the creation of sinusoidal wave forms, if desired. More recently, the second method, CNC hobbing, has become commonplace.

Depending on software limitations, CNC allows cutting gears in almost any desired form.  A disadvantage to this approach is the high cost of the equipment, though the payback has decreased considerably, in recent years.

New CNC shapers can cut a crown gear or spline without the need for buying a special crowning cam.  On our Gleason Pfauter P 300 ES, for example, we can crown by cutting a slight right and left hand helix angle along the face width of the part.  This leaves the root diameter straight.  We also have a Bourn & Koch Fellows MS 450 with a U-axis for controlling the back-off.  It can be programmed to move the cutter spindle in and out during the stroking cycle to crown the tooth by cutting deeper at the ends of the face width and more shallow at the high point of the crown.

Who is using this gear cutting technology today?

Users of heavily loaded gears have been using crowning for quite some time.  Another area ripe for the use of crowning is in the manufacturer of hydraulic wobble motors. Here, the application is strictly for misalignment problems rather than for noisereduction. An allied area involves heavily loaded pinions used in actuators for aircraft control surfaces. Generally speaking, it is more advantageous to crown the pinion because it makes more revolutions per minute and may generate more noise. In this case, it is of paramount importance to compensate for load deflection. Unfortunately, few companies in the United States have been applying this technology to commercial fine pitch gearing. However. the few manufacturers who have tried it are most pleased with the results. Some users have reported a 5x to 10x reduction in noise, accompanied by less vibration, wear and power draw.

Prime candidates for use of the crowning technique are the small fractional horsepower motor manufacturers or anyone dealing with spur or helical pinions that are susceptible to noise or misalignment. Because crowning on foreign gear hobbing equipment has been available for a greater length of time, this method has been developed to a greater extent in Europe.

American manufacturers would be wise to take advantage of the availability of this kind of technology. Exploration of crowning as a solution to noise and misalignment problems can produce a real competitive advantage for gear manufacturers and users alike.

Fred Young, CEO Forest City Gear Roscoe, Illinois

For more information, please contact Fred Young at: Forest City Gear 11715 Main Street Roscoe, IL 61073 fyoung@forestcitygear.com 866-623-2168

AUTHOR-Fred Young is the owner and CEO of Forest City Gear Co. in Roscoe, Illinois. He has worked for the company since the mid-1950s and assumed its management in 1968. He is a graduate of Rockford College, where he studied physics, mathematics and English literature.  Mr. Young is a leading authority on gear manufacturing.

Agency contact: Tim Daro Bernard & Company tdaro@bernardandcompany.com 847-934-4500

Editor note:  Mr. Young is available for interviews on this or other gear design and manufacturing issues.  Please contact agency to arrange. Also, any publication-generated leads from this article should be sent to Wendy Young at wyoung@forestcitygear.com.  Thanks!

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Handwheel Mode For Specialized Processing Operations in Locomotive Wheel Manufacturing for SCHÖMA

Practical Operation

The SCHÖMA machine factory opted for a cycle turning machine with Sinumerik 840D solution line CNC for the manufacturing of individual parts and small batches of locomotive wheels; this machine also features Siemens ShopTurn with Manual Machine function. This hardware and software solution combines the flexibility and benefits of conventional machining with the productivity and efficiency of a CNC and this is what tipped the balance in its favor for one customer.

Christoph Schöttler Maschinenfabrik GmbH (SCHÖMA) is based in Diepholz, Germany. The company specializes in the development and production of diesel-engine locomotives. The model range includes tunnel and shunting locomotives; service, field and narrow-gauge locomotives; handcars, passenger carriages and gang cars. Around 90 percent of the locomotives produced each year at SCHÖMA are destined for use in tunnel construction.

Each construction project brings its own specific requirements and each country through which the locomotives travel has different environmental and safety legislation. SCHÖMA uses a modular system to meet a diverse range of customer requirements and the resulting need for a variety of equipment and product versions. One of the tasks facing the company is working out how to equip the locomotives for transportation by rail on differing track widths. Another requirement is locomotives with driving wheels featuring diameters between 600 mm and 900 mm, depending on local track usage.

The right decision

Faced with even more demanding requirements in terms of production capacity and flexibility, SCHÖMA’s Managing Director, Christoph Schöttler, last year decided to add a cycle-control Seiger Record LC 1400 lathe to his inventory of machines. “We opted for a head turning machine, as we do not need a tailstock to produce driving wheels, axle bearing housings and gear wheels. It is working just as we envisioned, so we obviously made the right decision,” says Schöttler.

SCHÖMA constructs around 120 locomotives each year, which equates to 480 wheels. In addition, there are also repair orders, which increase the workload to between 560 and 600 driving wheels per year. These wheels are produced in two mountings from forged blanks on the cycle turning machine. The first mounting is used to machine the wheel flange on the reverse side and the wheel hub. The shaft locating bore is pre-turned. In the second mounting, the first task is to pre-turn the driving wheel profile, then the rolling circle level and the wheel shaft locating bore are finished.

Careful approach

The cycle turning machine is controlled by a Siemens Sinumerik 840D sl CNC, equipped with the ShopTurn software package with Manual Machine feature. If required, ShopTurn programming can be performed on a separate PC as part of an operator’s work planning, without interrupting the work sequences on the machine. The programs are routed to the machine via the network, where they are called up as required, depending on the workpieces to be produced. The Sinumerik CNC is used for both numerically controlled machining and manual operation with the ShopTurn’s Manual Machine functions. In manual mode with electronic handwheels, the machine behaves just like a conventional lathe with an actual value display.

During face and longitudinal turning, the process operates with the entered feed and spindle speed. The real highlight of the system is that every cycle can be used straightaway, without having to create a custom program. At SCHÖMA, the option for manual intervention is used for setting the zero point or for simple contours. Diameters are determined manually, if driving wheels have been newly profiled or if driving wheel profiles require resurfacing. The wheel profiles abrade as a result of the high loads experienced in heavy-duty operation or on poor-quality tracks or as a result of the driven wheels skidding.

“With a machine that uses only CNC, it is difficult to rework the driving wheels, as it is not possible to determine how much material needs to be removed. With this optional manual mode, however, users can adopt a careful approach. This sums up the ease of control,” explains Walter Horstmann, head of mechanical production and wheel set construction at SCHÖMA.

Siemens ShopTurn with Manual Machine for the job shop

After machine start-up, the basic MANUAL screen is immediately displayed and offers direct access to choosing machining options without having to create a parts program.

Machining procedures such as “taper turning” and “straight line face and longitudinal turning” can be executed immediately. The operator simply selects tool, feed speed, spindle speed and orientation, plus, if required, machining angle, then presses “Start”. The active direction is graphically displayed in the basic screen, using a compass rose symbol. All machining steps such as entry, thread grinding and drilling can also be started in manual mode.

For additional product information and inquirie, contact:

SIEMENS MACHINE TOOL BUSINESS
John Meyer
Manager, Marketing Communications
Siemens Industry, Inc.
(847) 640-1595
www.usa.siemens.com/cnc
SiemensMTBUMarCom.industry@siemens.com
Follow us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/SiemensCNC or Twitter:  www.twitter.com/siemens_cnc_us.

Siemens Industry Sector is the world’s leading supplier of innovative and environmentally friendly products, solutions and services for industrial customers. With end-to-end automation technology and industrial software, solid vertical-market expertise, and technology-based services, the sector enhances its customers’ productivity, efficiency and flexibility. With a global workforce of more than 100,000 employees, the Industry Sector comprises the Industry Automation, Drive Technologies and Customer Services Divisions as well as the Metals Technologies Business Unit. For more information, visit http://www.usa.siemens.com/industry.

The Siemens Drive Technologies Division is the world’s leading supplier of products, systems, applications, solutions and services for the entire drive train, with electrical and mechanical components. Drive Technologies serves all vertical markets in the production and process industries as well as the infrastructure/energy segment. With its products and solutions, the division enables its customers to achieve productivity, energy efficiency and reliability. For more information, visit http://www.usa.siemens.com/drivetechnologies.

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HAN-KWANG INTRODUCES THREE NEW LASERS

HAN-KWANG INTRODUCES THREE NEW LASERS

Korean giant enters U.S. market with big splash at recent FABTECH show

PL Machine

At the recent FABTECH show in Chicago, the largest builder of laser machines in Korea introduced three new CO2 lasers for metal fabrication, including two plate/sheetmetal machines and one tube/pipe cutter.  Reaction from the attendees was very positive and interest quite high, as all three machines ran continuously throughout the show.

Details on the machines follow here:

Han-Kwang takes the next step in its technology development with the introduction of the Series PL laser system.  Incorporating our unique Beam Radius Control (BRC) and Constant Beam Delivery System (CBDS), Series PL also features the newest Han-Kwang laser technology, our S5 High-Speed Cutting Head, which significantly increases the cutting speeds on all sheet metals, up to 1120 IPM for 20ga mild steel and 790 IPM for 16ga stainless. In addition, the practical machine design and highly functional, ergonomic controls make the Series PL the new benchmark in long gantry laser systems.

Features

BRC-Beam Radius Control

Through optimizing the beam diameter for each different material and thickness, cut quality is greatly increased.

CBDS-Constant Beam Delivery System

By keeping the entire length of the beam delivery constant over the work area, beam quality at the cutting focal point is enhanced.

S5 High Speed Cutting Head

Adopting the new generation of the sensing board and the cutting head means cutting speeds for sheet metals such as mild steel, stainless and aluminum are dramatically increased.

PMU-Plasma Monitoring Unit

Constantly monitors cut error such as plasma and restart with faster piercing and more stable cutting quality.

LCS-Lens Crack Sensor

Built-in LCS monitors the status of lens contamination to give maintenance personnel instant alerts for replacement.

Rotary axis for tube cutting

Cuts tubes up to 12” OD to give your operation substantial flexibility in work strategies

Siemens SINUMERIK 840D with 15” touch screen

Use of the highest powered CNC, with open architecture and simplified set-up with plain language commands, plus full interface to your shop programming/monitoring network, means greater productivity at the machine and overall in your operation

Onboard high-efficiency air filter & dehumidifier with monitoring window

Utilizing its own power supply, this unique Han-Kwang system guarantees contamination-free cutting and unmatched consistency.

—————————————————————–

PS Machine

Han-Kwang takes the next step in its technology development with the introduction of the Series PS laser system.  Incorporating our unique Beam Radius Control (BRC) and Constant Beam Delivery System (CBDS), Series PS also features the newest Han-Kwang laser technology, our S5 High-Speed Cutting Head, which significantly increases the cutting speeds on all sheet metals, up to 1120 IPM for 20ga mild steel and 790 IPM for 16ga stainless. In addition, the practical machine design and highly functional, ergonomic controls make the Series PS the new benchmark in short gantry laser systems.

Features

BRC-Beam Radius Control

Through optimizing the beam diameter for each different material and thickness, cut quality is greatly increased.

CBDS-Constant Beam Delivery System

By keeping the entire length of the beam delivery constant over the work area, beam quality at the cutting focal point is enhanced.

S5 High Speed Cutting Head

Adopting the new generation of the sensing board and the cutting head means cutting speeds for sheet metals such as mild steel, stainless and aluminum are dramatically increased.

PMU-Plasma Monitoring Unit

Constantly monitors cut error such as plasma and restart with faster piercing and more stable cutting quality.

LCS-Lens Crack Sensor

Built-in LCS monitors the status of lens contamination to give maintenance personnel instant alerts for replacement.

Siemens SINUMERIK 840D with 15” touch screen

Use of the highest powered CNC, with open architecture and simplified set-up with plain language commands, plus full interface to your shop programming/monitoring network, means greater productivity at the machine and overall in your operation

Onboard high-efficiency air filter & dehumidifier with monitoring window

Utilizing its own power supply, this unique Han-Kwang system guarantees contamination-free cutting and unmatched consistency.

—————————————————————–

Han-Kwang takes the next step forward in fully automated tube cutting systems with the introduction of the new Series TL.  All our experience in tube cutting technology has joined with our expertise in the design and engineering of materials handling systems to offer users a very affordable yet superior quality and highly flexible system for virtually non-stop production of tubes and shapes.  Coupled with our exclusive Han-Kwang ProDesign 3D CAM/CAM software and fully controlled by a single CNC workstation, Series PL will provide unmatched productivity to your operation.

Highlight of the Series TL is our highly advanced S5 cutting head, which combines superior measurement and sensing mechanisms to change from signal size to pulse monitoring, resulting in optimum cutting conditions. This new cutting head design is further enhanced by Han-Kwang’s quick piercing nitrogen-injection technology.  Smaller holes, quicker ambient area cooling and a substantial reduction in hole-to-hole cutting time will all benefit your production and your bottom line.

Features

•      BRC-Beam Radius Control

•      CBDS-Constant Beam Delivery System

•      Magazine-fed bundle tube loading system

•      Tube V-support system

•      Rotary chucking system

•      Completely enclosed safety workstation with automatic doors and light barrier system

•      Panasonic 2500W resonator

•      Cutting capability to 21’ long x 6” diameter

•      Material thicknesses to 0.25” mild steel and 0.2” stainless

•      Siemens SINUMERIK 840D, the highest-powered CNC on the market for maintaining complete processing cycle control by a single operator, using touchscreen and simple language commands

•      ProDesign 3D CAD/CAM enabling fast adjustments to the production scheduling to yield maximum productivity from the system

•      Unique Han-Kwang air filtration and dehumidifying system for cleaner cuts and more operator-friendly environment

For more information on this emerging new player in the laser machine market, please contact:

Robert Won,  Director/North American Sales

HANKWANG USA, INC. Web:  www.hankwang.com

Agency contact: Tim Daro Bernard & Company www.bernardandcompany.com


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Prototype Shop Gets 20% Faster Set-up and Running Times With New CNC Turning Machine

Fryer Easy Turn Combination Lathe with Siemens SINUMERIK 840D sl CNC lets operators at Continental Machine program, set-up and run faster; critical for one-off operations

By definition, says Josh Johnson, vice-president, Continental Machine, Rockford, Illinois, his prototype and short-run production shop must constantly run lean.  There can be no tolerating excessive programming, set-up or machining time of any kind, otherwise the shop loses and, in this economy, Johnson notes, that is simply unacceptable.

Continental Machine is a seven-person, 13,000 square-foot facility that houses a variety of CNC milling, turning, wire EDM, hole popping and grinding machines, as well as various sheetmetal and plastic injection molding machinery.  Therefore, the shop is well positioned to produce a wide variety of metal and plastic prototypes used by its diverse customer base, which spans markets such as window hardware, bicycle components, automotive parts, chemical processing, medical devices and foodservice equipment.  Materials processed here are just as wide-ranging, including aluminum, CRS, tool steels such as A2 and D2, zinc, brass, copper, bronze, titanium and a variety of engineered plastics such as glass-filled Delrin.

Recently, this job shop purchased a Fryer Easy Turn-21 CNC Combination Lathe, controlled by a Siemens SINUMERIK 840D sl numerical control.  The two operators responsible for this machine upgrade at Continental had limited experience with CNC and none whatsoever with the Siemens protocol, as this was the first of its kind at the shop.

The Easy Turn-21 was particularly appealing to Josh Johnson, who comments, “The set-up is extremely easy.  Teaching the tools, altering the lengths and diameters is kept very simple.  After the initial learning curve, which took only a few days, the operators picked up on the conversational programming, right away.  Also, one of the best features on the machine was that you could still turn the parts by using the electronic handwheel and just one function, such as hogging off material automatically or putting on a tapered thread.”  He noted this feature was not only more comfortable for the operators, but it also allowed them to quickly and efficiently prove out part programs.  Johnson commented that this would not have been possible on previous machines, owing to the flexibility of the control onboard the Fryer.  The result has been a minimum 20% improvement in the overall cycle time on most part programs run at Continental.  For this primarily prototype job shop, that fact translates into a substantial increase in the work product possible here.

Echoing this sentiment, Sue Ostrander, sales manager, Fryer Machine Systems, explained the process that led her company to select the SINUMERIK 840D sl numerical control for all its milling and turning machines, a move that was recently formalized by the company and announced to the trade.

“Since its inception 26 years ago, family-owned Fryer Machine Systems has based its operation on three core principles: build a quality product, price it fairly and provide quality service. This philosophy has allowed Fryer’s business to grow even in challenging times,” she said.

Fryer manufactures a diverse line of over 50 models of high-quality CNC machine tools in its 50,000 square-foot facility in Patterson, New York. Over the years, Fryer has become well-respected for its quality and innovation, throughout the job shop and production machining market segments.

“Moving to the Siemens 840D sl platform was the next step in Fryer’s ongoing commitment to provide our customers with the most innovative machine tools available in the market today,” Ostrander continued.  “The Siemens solution allows machine tool end-users to achieve higher productivity through easy and intuitive features and step-by-step, on-screen programming.  This enables them to dramatically reduce set-up, programming, and tooling times, while significantly increasing output.”

“The SINUMERIK 840D sl modular design allows us to take full advantage of the superior mechanical features in our machines,” continued Larry Fryer, president and CEO, Fryer Machine Systems. “Fryer has always been known for our easy conversational controls and the move to Siemens has allowed us to greatly enhance this feature,” Fryer noted. “The 840D sl menu-driven system combines an advanced geometry calculator that displays the part while the operator is programming it.  Sophisticated solid model graphics allow the operator to verify the part program with more clarity than ever before,” he said.

Larry Fryer has also been impressed with the automatic tool set-up and easy part set-up, made possible by the Siemens CNC.  Fryer explained that auto-run mode is where many operators experience difficulty.  Siemens and Fryer Machine Systems worked together to create an electronic handwheel run mode that gives the operator a safer way to prove out program execution, both forward and backward, using a standard electronic handwheel.

Fryer further stated, “Siemens provides us with a highly flexible solution that is critical to our ability to meet the specific needs of each customer.  Our enhanced capability to offer the same control for both turning and milling gives Fryer machines a unified platform that is very important to customers both in the short-term and for long range expansion.  Coupled with Siemens quality and reliability, they are invaluable to us in competing in today’s aggressive marketplace.”

Johnson added this comment on the service and training received by his operators at Continental.  “Siemens has been helpful and very thorough in their training and after-sale service.  The ShopTurn program, being integral to the control, now enables us to accurately determine tool path, potential collisions, tool changes and real world run time.  This makes our operators’ jobs much easier, with the added benefit of allowing us to estimate much more accurately than ever.”  Johnson further noted the CNC has substantial hard drive space, thus allowing most programs to be stored directly on the machine, though the company does maintain a back-up system.

For more information on this story, please contact:

CONTINENTAL MACHINE CO. 
Email:  conmach@onecommail.com

FRYER MACHINE SYSTEMS, INC. 
Web:  www.fryermachine.com

SIEMENS MACHINE TOOL BUSINESS
John Meyer
Manager, Marketing Communications
Siemens Industry, Inc.
(847) 640-1595
www.usa.siemens.com/cnc
SiemensMTBUMarCom.industry@siemens.com
Follow us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/SiemensCNC or Twitter:  www.twitter.com/siemens_cnc_us.

Siemens Industry Sector is the world’s leading supplier of innovative and environmentally friendly products, solutions and services for industrial customers. With end-to-end automation technology and industrial software, solid vertical-market expertise, and technology-based services, the sector enhances its customers’ productivity, efficiency and flexibility. With a global workforce of more than 100,000 employees, the Industry Sector comprises the Industry Automation, Drive Technologies and Customer Services Divisions as well as the Metals Technologies Business Unit. For more information, visit http://www.usa.siemens.com/industry.

The Siemens Drive Technologies Division is the world’s leading supplier of products, systems, applications, solutions and services for the entire drive train, with electrical and mechanical components. Drive Technologies serves all vertical markets in the production and process industries as well as the infrastructure/energy segment. With its products and solutions, the division enables its customers to achieve productivity, energy efficiency and reliability. For more information, visit http://www.usa.siemens.com/drivetechnologies.

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Enclosures Protecting Standby Power Generating Stations At Michigan Milk Producers Association

Hennig custom enclosures on generators provided through W.W. Williams to huge dairy products processing plant in Michigan.

Machesney Park, IL-On a recent installation at the Ovid, Michigan processing plant of the Michigan Milk Producers Association (MMPA), the standby power generation system supplier, W.W. Williams (WWW) of Dearborn, Michigan, required an increased level of sound and environmental protection on the three generating stations, in accordance with the specs received from their customer’s architectural firm.  They turned to their enclosure suppliers for assistance, as the challenges were many.  For the complete package, the project was awarded to Hennig.  As WWW’s Brunswick, Ohio-based project manager on the job, Al LaManna, puts it, “We’d begun to see Hennig as our go-to guys on enclosures, owing to the continued satisfaction we’d experienced with their levels of quality, engineering and especially responsive service.”

The Ovid facility of MMPA processes over three million pounds of milk per day, specializing in the production of liquid dairy blends, dry powders and bulk butter.  These dairy ingredients are offered in spray-dried, liquid, condensed and instantized forms.  Fluid products are typically loaded for bulk tanker or 55-gallon drum delivery, while powders are packed in 50 lb. bags, 25 kg bags or one-ton totes.  Butter is produced in 25 kg cubes.  Such production processes place substantial load on the local utility company’s power generation system and also create ambient dust contaminant challenges for the plant’s equipment.

During the construction process on the three enclosures needed for the standby power generators, extra attention was given to the insulation, silencers and electrical controls for the unit, to ensure proper functioning, sound attenuation and minimized environmental impact.  These enclosures and fuel tank assemblies further required additional features, as mandated by the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality, including overflow protection valves with a spill box for fuel containment on the remote filling apparatus, fill panel alarm system with level switch, extended vents above the roof line, a special mastic coating on the bottom of the fuel tank and stainless steel fuel supply and return lines.

Following the submission of the complete specification and winning the job, Hennig engineers Christian Grobe and Robin Moore, as well as sales rep Matt Sopchyk, led the team that produced the enclosures at the company’s manufacturing/fabricating facility in Rockford, Illinois.  Al LaManna had occasion to visit the plant during the construction and was impressed by the efficiency of the vertical integration.  Hennig performs all metal fabrication, finishing and the rigorous testing to UL standards in-house.  “Even a midstream specification change by our customer was handled at Hennig with no upset in the production schedule,” notes LaManna.

Founded in Columbus, Ohio in 1912, W.W. Williams has evolved from one of the nation’s largest industrial distribution, repair and service companies to a highly diversified solutions provider.  They provide solutions to customers with technical / mechanical service and repair, remanufacturing, warehouse / supply chain management and service a varied customer base. Their products and services include diesel engines, transmissions, heavy duty truck repair, refrigeration, power generation and third party supply chain logistics services. Their customers comprise on-highway trucking, off-highway equipment, Department of Defense OEM’s, vehicle OEM’s, U.S. Military and marine enterprises.  The company represents the MTU Onsite Energy group and specializes in gas and diesel engine systems, fuel cell systems, gas turbine systems and gen-drive engines, to provide primary, standby and continuous power.

As Territory Manager for the company, Todd James Rundhaug, observes, “We are constantly looking for quality component suppliers to complement our MTU Onsite Energy power generating equipment.  We began our relationship with Hennig in 2008 and have been extremely satisfied with the quality, workmanship, delivery and especially the after-sales sales support on their enclosures and fuel tanks.  Due to a variety of factors, our types of equipment require highly specialized enclosures and UL Rated fuel tanks.  The total service package from Hennig on these products has been excellent.”  LaManna agrees, noting his customers’ repeat satisfaction with the full package supplied by Hennig.  On this Michigan Milk Producers job, Hennig supplied the enclosures, each equipped with a heater, overhead lights, powered louvers, battery back-up lighting with NiCad battery power and GFI wall outlets.

Point man on the job for Hennig Enclosure Systems was Matt Sopchyk, who noted there were three enclosures needed for the onsite generators on this project.  Each generator is a 2000 KW unit, with a sub-base fuel tank holding 3480 gallons of diesel.  “Hennig design standards for this application included our complete in-house powder coating process for the enclosure walls, doors and roof sections over the all galvanealled steel construction. This job was finished in MTU gray, matching their gensets.”

The UL142 approved steel fuel tanks are finished with a phosphoric pretreatment high-pressure wash and then a 2-step polyurethane process. Hennig enclosures are of a semi-monocoque design, meaning the structural integrity and inner strength are engineered and built into every panel and roof section. This allows for clean and functional design, without the need for separate framing or additional substrate supports of any kind.  Also, the Hennig fuel tanks are engineered and built in a similar way, with full interior baffling and sub-structure integrity to support the genset without the need for surface mounted I-beams to support the genset or the need for an additional, costly raised floor above the tank top. The tank top is the floor within the genset.

To learn more about Hennig products & services, visit www.hennigworldwide.com or call contact:

Tim Waterman
Hennig Inc.
9900 N. Alpine Rd.
Machesney Park, IL 61115
(815) 316-5277
info@hennig.ame.com
www.hennigworldwide.com

Connect with Hennig online: yt wp twit li gplus fb thomasnet

 

Hennig, Inc., at www.hennigworldwide.com, has been designing and producing custom machine protection and chip/coolant management products for state-of-the-art machine tools for over 50 years. Hennig products are designed to protect against corrosion, debris and common workplace contaminants. Hennig has manufacturing facilities in the U.S., Germany, Czech Republic, France, Brazil, India, Japan, China and South Korea. Its North American repair centers are located in Machesney Park, Ill.; Chandler, Okla.; Livonia, Mich.; Blue Ash, Ohio; Mexico City, Mexico; and Saltillo, Mexico.

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83% Increase in Machining Efficiency on Oil Valves Reported

Kimray, Inc., an Oklahoma City-based manufacturer of control valves and related equipment for oil and gas producing companies, reports an 83% increase in their machining efficiency, achieved largely as the result of recently acquired CNC production equipment.

Founded in 1948 by Garman Kimmell, Kimray operates a 274,000 sq. ft. facility and employs over 400 people to serve its expanding customer base of oil and gas producing companies.  Kimray machines iron, steel and aluminum, as well as thermoplastic materials, to build its comprehensive line of control valves, thermostats, energy-exchange glycol pumps, gas-operated pilots and other process control devices.  Their products are used to control vessel and lead line temperatures, liquid level inside pressurized vessels, pressure drops and liquid/gas flow.

The company maintains a turnkey manufacturing facility, including dozens of lathes, grinders, turning, milling, sawing and bore finishing/honing machine tools, nearly all with CNC systems onboard. Originally, two machines were purchased, an Emco Maier EMCOTURN 420 MC PLUS and HYPERTURN 665 MC PLUS Lathes, each equipped with Siemens SINUMERIK 840D CNCs and SIMODRIVE 611D drive packages. As their productivity greatly increased, Kimray decided to purchase two more Emco Maier machines to keep up with increased demand for their products.

The company operates a host system for file storage and back-up on all part production data.  As one operator of these lathes observed, “I liked the Fanuc 18i-T CNC we used on other machines in the shop, but, with the SINUMERIK 840D, you can do so much more, such as instant programming and cut and paste operations, while the machine is running or stopped.  Each screen allows you to be very detailed about what you’re doing, such as separating your mains from your subs with your part and workpiece programs.  I use the Siemens CNC for axis and spindle movements on both machines (Emco Maier 420 Dual Main and Counter spindle Machine and the 665 Main and Counter Spindle Machine). My programs and data can be recessed easily and transferred back to the machines (from the company’s main host system), as needed.  I can run my programs out of workpieces and sub-spindles, including milling and stenciling out of the sub-programs.  I use the parts program as my way to transfer files and folders to the main system and back again.”

He further commented on the controls, “On a typical set-up, I like the sensitivity of the CNC.  Being able to move the axis only a ten thousandth at a time to a hundred thousandth at a time comes in very handy for me.  I also like the program test feature, especially on new programs.  Each tool has its own geometry page and up to four offsets, making things much less complicated.”

Lastly, regarding the machine builder, this operator noted, “I received lots of good advice and training from the folks at Emco Maier, especially Doug Poling.  He’s also assisted me a few times by phone, when needed.”

In the manufacture of its oil and gas production controls, Kimray typically machines bar stock of 303, 304, 310, 316 and 17-4 stainless, as well as D-2 tool steel, 6061-T6 aluminum, brass, Delrin and Teflon.  Cast iron, ductile, steel, stainless and aluminum are also machined here. The 83% increase in machining efficiency has been achieved, due to these four Emco Maier machines with Siemens CNCs, according to Kimray sources and company production data.

In determining the increase in overall machining efficiency at Kimray, VP of Operations David Hill commented, “Our commitment to run CNC machine tools has long been in place and the addition of the Emco Maier lathes with Siemens controls onboard are the latest steps in this process.  We’ve literally had no problems with these machines, the CNC’s or the drives.  When Kimray operators can keep running and producing parts in such a way, the impact on our overall efficiency is immediate and substantial.”

Mike Morris, Kimray’s Plant Engineer, added that “the control is strong and easy for the operators to use”.  Over the years, the CNCs have been virtually bulletproof.”

From the builder’s perspective, Emco Maier shares Kimray’s appreciation for the performance of its CNC/drive package supplier.

“Our 420 machine enables simultaneous production of two parts without interruption or collision.  The digital drives (Siemens SIMODRIVE 611D) produce dynamic performance in both the main spindle and X/Z axes,” commented the company’s Director of Sales Support Operations for Emco Maier USA.  “Plus, programming is just the same as on any CNC lathe.  Only one program is generated.  The program for the second workpiece is simply transferred to the bottom system by means of a selector switch.  No additional programming is necessary.  As we like to say, twice as nice.”

The 665 Hyperturn machine enables true 4-axis machining plus full c-axis capability on both the main and counter spindles.  The 665 uses some of the same programming features, plus the same digital drive system as the 420, but in a larger package.

For more information on this story, please contact any of the following individuals:

KIMRAY, INC. 
Web: www.kimray.com Email: info@kimray.com

EMCO MAIER CORP.
Web: www.emcomaier-usa.com

SIEMENS MACHINE TOOL BUSINESS
John Meyer
Manager, Marketing Communications
Siemens Industry, Inc.
(847) 640-1595
www.usa.siemens.com/cnc
SiemensMTBUMarCom.industry@siemens.com
Follow us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/SiemensCNC or Twitter:  www.twitter.com/siemens_cnc_us.

Siemens Industry Sector is the world’s leading supplier of innovative and environmentally friendly products, solutions and services for industrial customers. With end-to-end automation technology and industrial software, solid vertical-market expertise, and technology-based services, the sector enhances its customers’ productivity, efficiency and flexibility. With a global workforce of more than 100,000 employees, the Industry Sector comprises the Industry Automation, Drive Technologies and Customer Services Divisions as well as the Metals Technologies Business Unit. For more information, visit http://www.usa.siemens.com/industry.

The Siemens Drive Technologies Division is the world’s leading supplier of products, systems, applications, solutions and services for the entire drive train, with electrical and mechanical components. Drive Technologies serves all vertical markets in the production and process industries as well as the infrastructure/energy segment. With its products and solutions, the division enables its customers to achieve productivity, energy efficiency and reliability. For more information, visit http://www.usa.siemens.com/drivetechnologies.

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New Waterjet Deburring/Cleaning/Rust Inhibiting System Saves Space and Capital

Bertsche iJet waterjet deburring system built for Linamar combines waterjet deburring with part cleaning for one inline system.

Canadian automotive part supplier realizes significant gains with Bertsche-designed multi-function system in its plant

With factory floor space at a premium and capital equipment funds scarce, Linamar, a Tier One Canadian automotive part supplier, turned to Bertsche Engineering recently for an all-in-one part deburring, final rinse and drying solution.

Typically, complex machined automotive parts with multiple intersecting holes require feature-specific part deburring to insure that parts are burr-free.  After deburring, parts also need a final cleaning/washing to insure removal of microscopic particles that might adversely affect performance. They are then preserved with a rust or oxidation inhibitor and dried for shipment (transport) to be assembled. Usually, this involves separate pieces of equipment linked by conveyors or robots to transport parts to each machine.

To solve the problem of densely filled factory floor space, Bertsche Engineering developed a machine that handles all these processes in one machine, in one deburring cycle.  The machine takes oil and chip contaminated parts, previously machined on CNC milling centers and mill/turn machines, then selectively deburrs critical features using high pressure water, blasting chips out of internal cavities, knocking off all feather-edge burrs and fan washing the outside of the part, using a CNC for full cycle control.

Close-up shows parts infeed and outfeed station, where considerable space savings were realized by the customer, Linamar, a major Canadian Tier One automotive parts supplier.

This process is accomplished by a series of rotating lance nozzles that probe small diameter internal holes in order to blast feather edge burrs clean at intersection points and wash chips out of dead-end passages.  External features are then blasted with a series of direct nozzles that release up to 10,000 psi of water at the burr while tracing the part edges. The part is then washed with high-pressure rotating fan nozzles.  Note: When required, additional mechanical wire and filament brush tooled deburring stations can be incorporated into the Bertsche system to mechanically remove burrs.

The same machine moves the deburred part to an agitated wash and rinse station, where the part is rinsed, cleaned and preserved with an aqueous rust inhibitor (providing up to 24-day protection) and is finally dried. The part is then ready for final assembly.

Close-up shows parts being indexed over high-pressure (10,000 psi) waterjet nozzles for full wash cycle and rust-inhibiting aqueous coating process

For more information on this application, please contact:

BERTSCHE ENGINEERING CORPORATION www.bertsche.com

PR agency contact: Tim Daro Bernard & Company  www.bernardandcompany.com

Release:  BERTSCHE ENGINEERING CORPORATION

Date:  December 28, 2009


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Grieve Corporation 2000°F Inert Atmosphere Heavy-Duty Box Furnace

No. 954 is an electrically-heated 2000°F(~1093°C) inert atmosphere heavy-duty box furnace from Grieve, currently used for heat treating titanium at the customer’s facility. 57 KW are installed in nickel chrome wire coils, supported by vacuum-formed ceramic fiber, to heat the load. Workspace dimensions are 30” wide x 48” deep x 30” high. The oven’s 7” thick insulated walls comprise 5” of 2300°F ceramic fiber and 2” of 1700°F ceramic fiber, while the 6-1/2” floor insulation comprises 4-1/2” of 2300°F firebrick and 2” of 1200°F block insulation.

The unit is equipped with a roof-mounted heat-resisting alloy recirculating fan, powered by a 1-HP motor with V-belt drive, motor-operated vertical lift door, 100 lb. capacity alloy loading cart with cast alloy roller rails, 3-1/2” diameter cast alloy rollers and a roller rail loading table with 4” diameter cast iron rollers.

This Grieve furnace also features inert atmosphere construction, consisting of a continuously welded outer shell, high temperature door gasket, sealed heater terminal boxes, inert atmosphere inlet, inert atmosphere outlet and inert atmosphere flowmeter.

Controls onboard No. 954 include a digital programming temperature controller, manual reset excess temperature controller with separate contactors, plus a strip chart recorder.

For more information, please contact: THE GRIEVE CORPORATION,   Web: www.grievecorp.com.

Agency contact: Tim Daro, Bernard & Company

NEWS RELEASE:  THE GRIEVE CORPORATION

DATE:   December 21, 2009


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