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Exact Metrology Exhibits at Power-Gen

Exact Metrology will exhibit at this year’s Power-Gen International held in Orlando, Florida. Celebrating 30 years, Power-Gen focuses on all forms of power generation and brings together key suppliers and service providers with influential decision makers in the international power generation sector.

At this show, Exact Metrology’s objective is to connect with companies that produce parts or assemble them. These can be part manufacturers such as: pumps, housing turbines, etc. Likewise, they can be the facilities that assemble these complex parts. Exact’s target personnel includes manufacturing engineers, quality control, quality assurance, design engineers and project managers.

Exact Metrology offers the technology that users need in the power generation market. Some of the typical equipment used includes laser trackers, LIDAR scanners (Leica scan station, Surphaser), white light scanners and blue light scanners. Additional featured equipment are Romer arms and CT scanners.

The power generation market has many applications. Some of these are part qualification, part inspection, reverse engineering, part fit-up and facility scanning. Others include facility modeling, BIM modeling, color map inspections, as-built modeling and design intent modeling.

Exact Metrology will be at booth 4211 at Power-Gen between December 4 and December 6, 2018.


For more information, please contact:

Dean Solberg
Exact Metrology, Inc.
20515 Industry Avenue
Brookfield, WI 53045
Phone: 262-533-0800
Local: 866-722-2600
www.exactmetrology.com
deans@exactmetrology.com

or

Steve Young
Exact Metrology, Inc.
11575 Goldcost Drive
Cincinnati, OH 45249
Phone: 614-264-8587
Local: 513-831-6620
www.exactmetrology.com
stevey@exactmetrology.com

 

Exact Metrology, with facilities in Cincinnati and Milwaukee and affiliated offices throughout the Midwest, is a comprehensive metrology services provider, offering customers 3D and CT scanning, reverse engineering, quality inspection, product development and 2D drawings. The company also provides turnkey metrology solutions, including equipment sales and lease/rental arrangements. 

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Maya HTT and Siemens PLM sponsor premier showing of “First Man” movie in Montreal

250 aerospace supply company representatives enjoy hospitality, educational presentation and exclusive movie showing at Colossus de Laval in the Cosmodome

On Friday, October 12, approximately 250 suppliers to the bustling Montreal aerospace community gathered at the Colossus de Laval theater and entertainment complex for a premier showing of “First Man,” the new movie which traces the history of the first moon landing in 1969.  The film focuses on the life of Neil Armstrong, the American astronaut who took that “one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind.”

This event was sponsored jointly by Maya HTT and Siemens PLM, partners in service to the aerospace industry in Montreal.  Hosting the event was Ms. Rita Azrak, marketing director for Maya, who began the technical presentation portion of the day by musing that the actual “first foot” on the moon was Canadian, as the landing leg cones on the lunar excursion module Eagle were fabricated in Canada, a comment which aroused the crowd’s enthusiasm.

The three main speakers gave insights on their companies’ involvement in the industry and were quite optimistic for the future, as funding for renewed space exploration by both Canada and America is in the works with the respective countries’ governments.  Before the first speaker, a recorded message was shown from the first Canadian astronaut, Marc Garneau, now Minister of Transport in Canada and a veteran of three flights on the Space Shuttle.  He was followed by Mike Greenley, group president for MDA Corporation, a major aerospace supplier, George Rendell, senior director at Siemens and Marc Lafontaine, vice-president of Maya.  All spoke of the longtime benefits derived in our daily lives from the space program, over the decades, as well as the next major project now under way, the Lunar Orbital Platform-Gateway, a lunar orbit space station which, according to NASA documents, will serve as a solar-powered communications hub, science lab, short-term habitation module and holding area for space rovers and other robots.  They detailed some of the advancements and planned developments in artificial intelligence.

The program also included a variety of successes achieved with Siemens PLM products, especially NX CAD and NX CAM through the Teamcenter of product lifecycle management.  Maya is the Siemens partner in Montreal and brings further value to these products and others in the Siemens suite as a Platinum Level VAR, serving a broad spectrum of industries, including aerospace, defense, automotive, marine and commercial building.

Many in the audience were quite moved by the touching story of Neil Armstrong and his Apollo journey to the moon and back.

For more information on this interesting event or the sponsoring companies, contact:

Ms. Rita Azrak, Marketing Director
Maya HTT Ltd
4999 Ste-Catherine Ouest, Suite 400
Montreal, Quebec QC H3Z 1T3
Canada
Phone:  514-369-5706, ext. 236
Rita.Azrak@mayahtt.com
www.mayahtt.com

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250°F Special Electrically Heated Oven from Grieve

Electrically Heated Oven from GrieveNo. 861 is a 250°F (121°C), special electrically heated oven from Grieve, currently used for drying small parts in a tray at the customer’s facility. 3 KW are installed in Incoloy sheathed tubular heating elements, while a 300 CFM, 1/3 HP recirculating blower provides vertical airflow upward through tray to the workload.

This Grieve oven holds one stainless steel tray 6″ wide x 18″ long x 6″ deep with perforated bottom. The tray sets on drip trap/air diffuser which is removable for cleaning. Features include 2” insulated walls and Type 304, 2B finish stainless steel interior.

Controls on the No. 861 include a digital indicating temperature controller, manual reset excess temperature controller with separate contactors and a recirculating blower airflow safety switch.


For more information, please contact:
THE GRIEVE CORPORATION
500 Hart Road
Round Lake, Illinois 60073-2835
Phone: (847) 546-8225
Fax: (847) 546-9210
Web: www.grievecorp.com
Email: sales@grievecorp.com
Attention: Frank Calabrese

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Siemens Introduces Updated Converting Toolbox

Software solution combines maximum performance with minimal implementation time

Today’s converting industry requirements are continually increasing, due to higher production rates, more machine flexibility and optimum product quality, combined with new substrates and greater demand for fast changeovers. Industry-specific technologies also continue to demand more from the winding drive and automation systems. Siemens today announces its latest iteration of the popular Converting Toolbox to meet these challenges.   

The toolbox enables machine builders to achieve considerably faster time to market by reducing the time required for engineering, programming, commissioning and documentation as much as 80%.

The Siemens Converting Toolbox has separate modules for each of the Siemens product categories typically found on converting machines, including SIMOTION motion controllers, SINAMICS drives and SIMATIC PLCs.  SIMOTION is designed for high-performance motion control applications with centralized control in conjunction with the SINAMICS S120 drive system. SINAMICS is ideal for drive-based applications with process-related control implementation in the SINAMICS S120 drive system with graphical drag-and-drop programming. Lastly, the SIMATIC platform applies to centralized converting applications implemented in the PLC control to work in tandem with the SINAMICS S120 drive system.

Converting Toolbox for Simotion, Sinamics and SimaticComponents in the Converting Toolbox take the form of pre-programmed function blocks.  Sample applications demonstrate how each function can be efficiently and effectively incorporated into a machine design, whether a modification of a previous generation or an entirely new design. In addition, some applications are ready-to-use, after only minor modifications and include basic HMI functionality. Systems can be implemented in Ladder, Structured text or in a Graphical function block language.

Additional features of the Converting Toolbox include converting base applications such as: center winder, unwind flying splice control, sectional drive with tension/draw control, accumulator, rotary knife with print mark correction, flying saw, traversing control, synchronized multi axis drive control, load sharing, diagnostics Web pages, project generation tools and converting library process and logistic functions.  These function blocks can literally be cut and pasted into a new design, with minimal programming time.

Other specialized application blocks are available upon request.


For more information, please contact:

William Gilbert, Converting Market Manager
Siemens Industry Inc.
5300 Triangle Parkway
Norcross, GA 30092-2538, USA
Tel: +1678 314-4222
William.gilbert@siemens.com
www.usa.siemens.com/converting

Siemens Digital Factory (DF) offers a comprehensive portfolio of seamlessly integrated hardware, software and technology-based services in order to support manufacturing companies worldwide in enhancing the flexibility and efficiency of their manufacturing processes and reducing the time to market of their products.

Siemens Corporation is a U.S. subsidiary of Siemens AG, a global powerhouse focusing on the areas of electrification, automation and digitalization. One of the world’s largest producers of energy-efficient, resource-saving technologies, Siemens is a leading supplier of systems for power generation and transmission as well as medical diagnosis. With approximately 351,000 employees in 190 countries, Siemens reported worldwide revenue of $88.1 billion in fiscal 2016. Siemens in the USA reported revenue of $23.7 billion, including $5.4 billion in exports, and employs approximately 50,000 people throughout all 50 states and Puerto Rico.

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PaR Systems Uses Siemens Digital Tools to Make Crane Operations More Productive and Safe

It’s happened too many times: injuries, fatalities, and damage to plant assets resulting from crane-related accidents. The complex work performed by material handling cranes within aerospace, automotive, and metal processing facilities can lead to dangerous and costly accidents. How common is the problem? According to the Crane Inspection and Certification Bureau (CICB), approximately 80 crane-related deaths occur every year. Of all crane-related incidents, 90% are due to human error, 50% of the overall incidents result in a fatality, and 40% of the overall incidents involve someone being struck by the crane or an object that the crane is lifting or moving. Most of these errors correlate to a lack of operator training.

The Solution

Fortunately, recent advancements in digital technologies have fueled innovation in the field of crane control, and new solutions have been developed that are safer and smarter. One unique solution for modernizing cranes was designed to help operators by reducing load sway by a stunning 95%. This innovative solution, EXPERTOPERATOR™, was developed by PaR Systems (PaR) of Shoreview, Minnesota (www.par.com). PaR is a global manufacturer of advanced automation, robotic, and specialty material handling solutions. PaR supports global customers in automotive, aerospace, nuclear, life science, marine and other core industries.

EXPERTOPERATOR is an advanced crane motion control system implemented entirely within the Siemens platform. The system uses equipment such as Simatic S7 PLCs, Simatic HMI Panels, and Scalance W Industrial Wireless Modules. Unique algorithms within PaR’s software enables crane operators to more easily, quickly, and safely control the movements of payloads, such as dies and coils in automotive stamping plants. EXPERTOPERATOR is most effective for applications that require high throughput, and precise manipulation of loads to meet production demands and prevent collisions with sensitive equipment and personnel.

EXPERTOPERATOR is currently installed on over 150 cranes worldwide – many of which are located in automotive, primary metal, and heavy equipment industry facilities. Users have indicated that EXPERTOPERATOR has allowed operators to control their crane loads with 95% less sway and 90% fewer “close calls” or collisions. Optional modules to the EXPERTOPERATOR platform provide robust zone control, sideload/snag prevention, and automatic load positioning.

How material handling customers are benefitting from EXPERTOPERATOR

Across 150 installations, EXPERTOPERATOR has improved personnel safety, reduced damages to equipment, increased efficiency, and reduced maintenance costs.

  1. Heightened safety of people and product – EXPERTOPERATOR minimizes payload motion by intercepting an operator’s commands and adjusting the output to emulate those of an experienced operator. This technology is proven to reduce cable sway by 85-95%. Thus, operator concentration can be focused both on the load and on the immediate environment surrounding the adjacent plant floor, instead of controlling load sway. As a result, both the load and the surrounding equipment are less likely to suffer damage.
  2. Increased efficiency and productivity – Many of PaR’s customers run 24×7 operations and have reported significant improvements in productivity. For example, one customer in a high-throughput locomotive manufacturing process reported that the critical path load positioning time was reduced from approximately 4 minutes to less than 2 minutes. This result is not atypical. End users who implement EXPERTOPERATOR generally report between 10 and 50% reduction in load positioning time.
  3. Easier-to-use crane operations – Increased productivity is due – in part – to the reduction of load swing, which makes the crane easier to operate efficiently. The intense manual manipulation ordinarily required by an operator to mitigate load swing is replaced by a simpler manipulation task: positioning a stabilized and swing-free load.

The evidence that EXPERTOPERATOR makes cranes easier to operate is further demonstrated by data captured through operator studies that measured the frequency of button pushes. While using the technology, operators pressed pendant buttons 60- 80% less than while conducting the same manipulation task without EXPERTOPERATOR. This metric demonstrates that fewer commands are needed to manipulate a swing-free load.

  1. Rapid Operator Training – Because EXPERTOPERATOR makes cranes easier to use, novice operators can quickly become proficient. In fact, new operators who utilize the technology generally perform as well or better than their more experienced counterparts who use conventional cranes. This technology effectively accelerates the rate at which operators learn to drive safely and efficiently.
  2. Reduced maintenance costs – Each time a crane operator pushes a button, electric current rushes through the power section of the drives. The current also flows into the motors, and this causes torque to be propagated in the mechanical drive train through to the gears, wheels, and finally the rails of the crane’s infrastructure. When the number of starts, stops and surges in current are reduced by 60-80% with EXPERTOPERATOR, the life of that critical equipment is prolonged. As a result, the mean time between failure (MTBF) statistic is improved by a factor of 2-3 times and maintenance costs are drastically reduced.

 

Siemens reliable products and time-saving tools add value PaR Systems relied on Siemens because they place a priority on reliability and quality.

PaR Systems knew their success would depend on their ability to work with a partner who could provide critical hardware that is robust for industrial environments, quick to deploy, and highly configurable.

In material handling crane operations, wireless capability is a key operational factor. The Siemens Scalance W wireless solution offered PaR Systems a wireless component that was reliable and predictable. PaR had experience with non-Siemens wireless solutions in the past that were problematic, both functionally, and from a manufacturer support perspective. The Scalance W wireless solution can be configured to operate in a less congested frequency range (5 GHz), allowing for a more robust wireless signal. Since installing Siemens Scalance W wireless modules as part of their solutions, customers have experienced 100% uptime of their wireless communications. In addition to reliability, the Scalance Wireless Modules offered PaR exceptional customer and OEM technical support.

EXPERTOPERATOR is an advanced crane motion control system that is implemented entirely within the Siemens platform. The system uses equipment such as Simatic S7 PLCs, Simatic HMI Panels, and Scalance W Industrial Wireless Modules.

Time to market is also important to PaR Systems when delivering customer solutions. The Siemens Totally Integrated Automation (TIA) portal provided a platform to shorten engineering time through its simulation tools, programmer productivity tools, and additional diagnostics. PaR Systems benefitted from unique capabilities when programming the Simatic S7 PLCs and Simatic HMI Panel. They were able to dynamically change the cycle time of the main control loop during runtime, which is critical for optimizing the performance of their unique motion control. Debugging capabilities were enhanced because the tool monitors values and updates programs in real time for instantaneous feedback. Such tasks that are tedious and time consuming within other platforms happen automatically and dynamically when using the Siemens TIA solutions.

Material handling requires a fine balance between precision, efficiency, productivity, and most importantly, safety. As a result of the collaboration between PaR Systems and Siemens, new and experienced crane operators around the world can now confidently perform their tasks and contribute to enhanced plant safety and operational efficiency, while reducing equipment maintenance.


To learn more about how Siemens and PaR Systems can help digitalize operations, improve safety, and boost operational efficiency, visit https://www.siemens.com/global/en/home/products/automation.html or https://www.par.com/technologies/crane-controls/

Siemens Industry, Inc.
5300 Triangle Parkway
Norcross, GA 30092

For more information, please contact our Customer Support Center.
Phone: 1-800-241-4453
E-mail: info.us@siemens.com
usa.siemens.com

For specific information on this application, please contact:
Adam Shively
OEM Account Manager
Siemens Digital Factory
Phone:  952-221-3791
E-mail:  adam.shively@siemens.com
Support:  (800) 333-7421

 

The technical data presented in this document is based on an actual case or on as-designed parameters, and therefore should not be relied upon for any specific application and does not constitute a performance guarantee for any projects. Actual results are dependent on variable conditions. Accordingly, Siemens does not make representations, warranties, or assurances as to the accuracy, currency or completeness of the content contained herein. If requested, we will provide specific technical data or specifications with respect to any customer‘s particular applications. Our company is constantly involved in engineering and development. For that reason, we reserve the right to modify, at any time, the technology and product specifications contained herein.

 

About Siemens USA

Siemens Corporation is a U.S. subsidiary of Siemens AG, a global powerhouse focusing on the areas of electrification, automation and digitalization. One of the world’s largest producers of energy-efficient, resource-saving technologies, Siemens is a leading supplier of systems for power generation and transmission as well as medical diagnosis. With approximately 348,000 employees in more than 190 countries, Siemens reported worldwide revenue of $86.2 billion in fiscal 2015. Siemens in the USA reported revenue of $22.4 billion, including $5.5 billion in exports, and employs approximately 50,000 people throughout all 50 states and Puerto Rico.

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Exact Metrology Hosts Dual Open Houses Demonstrating Newest Products and Equipment in Metrology

Product demonstrations and technical presentations on 3D & CT scanning engage a large audience in both Wisconsin and Ohio

  • PolyWorks' Kurt Lammers presents to a packed room.
  • Scanning an airplane wing using the Leica AT960.
  • A scan of a dinosaur figure using the ATOS scanner.
  • Crowds gathered at Cincinnati's open house.
  • Scanning a motorcycle piece with the ROMER Absolute Arm.
  • A detailed scan of an iPhone using the Artec Spider.

Exact Metrology, a comprehensive metrology services provider, held dual open houses at their Brookfield, Wisconsin location on June 21 and their Cincinnati, Ohio location on June 26, along with partner company PolyWorks — a leading provider of universal 3D metrology software. Both companies showcased their newest products in software and hardware for 3D and CT scanning equipment. The event was attended by a large number of people from several Midwestern states and a diverse range of business sectors.

Hosted by co-presidents, Dean Solberg, (Brookfield, Wisconsin) and Steve Young, (Cincinnati, Ohio), the day included product demonstrations featuring the newest technology in 3D & CT scanning equipment, including the Romer SEI, Leica 402, SEI and Design X, CT, Leica P40, Surphaser, SEI and PC-DMIS, Revit Church Model, Atos/Breuckmann, Leica AT960 with the XL scanner and the Artec Ray (Brookfield). Multiple stations were set up throughout each facility, and much of the equipment was available for hands-on use by the attendees. Several attendees brought their own parts which were scanned onsite, then 3D printed.

Running simultaneously throughout the day were several breakout sessions on 3D printing by Jay Murray, Envisiontec (Brookfield, Wisconsin) and metrology hardware and software by Kurt Lammers, PolyWorks (Cincinnati, Ohio). In between sessions, attendees were treated to full buffet lunch, including a pig roast.

Attendees were heard discussing their excitement, and when attendee Mark Weigand, Raymond Corporation, was asked what the most interesting thing he saw was, his response was “I can’t narrow it down to one thing. The products are incredible. I saw some really neat things I had no idea existed.” Another attendee, Craig Pettinger, Senior SQUI Engineer, Cummins, said that “All of the workshops were especially helpful to not only answer questions, but letting people get a little experience with the types of equipment they are planning to purchase.” He was especially interested in the technology advancements in 3D printing and how to integrate it with reverse engineering.

Exact Metrology offers a complete line of portable scanning and measurement technologies as well as contract measurement for 3D laser scanning services, reverse engineering services, non-contact inspection, metrology services and 3D digitizing. The company’s newest equipment includes a GE CT Scanner at its Cincinnati location, the first in America being used for industrial metrology rather than medical testing. Exact sells and rents metrology equipment solutions, in addition to providing testing as a service and application software training.

For a 3-minute video demonstration of the Exact Metrology open houses, please see the video below:


For more information on this event, please contact:

Dean Solberg, Co-president
Exact Metrology, Inc.
20515 Industry Avenue
Brookfield, WI 53045
Phone: 262-533-0800
www.exactmetrology.com
deans@exactmetrology.com

Steve Young, Co-president
Exact Metrology, Inc.
11575 Goldcoast Drive
Cincinnati, OH 45249
Telephone:
Local: 513.831.6620
Toll Free: 855.463.7116
www.exactmetrology.com
stevey@exactmetrology.com

Exact Metrology is an ISO 9001:2008 and AS9100 Certified Company and ITAR Compliant and FFL Licensed

Exact Metrology, with facilities in Cincinnati and Milwaukee and affiliated offices throughout the Midwest, is a comprehensive metrology services provider, offering customers 3D and CT scanning, reverse engineering, quality inspection, product development and 2D drawings. The company also provides turnkey metrology solutions, including equipment sales and lease/rental arrangements.  

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950°F Belt Conveyor Oven from Grieve

950°F Belt Conveyor Oven from GrieveNo. 831 is a 950°F (510°C), belt conveyor oven from Grieve, currently used for heat treating springs at the customer’s facility. Workspace dimensions of this oven measure 14” W x 54” D x 3” H. 81,600 BTU/HR are installed in a modulating infrared natural gas burner to heat the oven chamber, while a 250 CFM, 1/3-HP recirculating blower provides vertical downward airflow to the workload.

This Grieve belt conveyor oven has a 12” long open belt loading zone and a 54” long insulated heat zone with recirculated airflow.  Features include a 12” long open unloading zone and a 10” wide, 0.041” high carbon steel woven wire conveyor belt with 1/40-HP motor variable speed drive.

Additional features include 4” thick insulated walls comprising 2” of 1990°F block and 2” of 10 lb./cf density rockwool and an aluminized steel interior and exterior. The oven is equipped with safety equipment required by IRI, FM and National Fire Protection Association Standard 86 for gas-heated equipment, including a 130 CFM 1/3-HP powered forced exhauster.

Controls on the No. 831 include a digital indicating temperature controller.


For more information, please contact:
THE GRIEVE CORPORATION
500 Hart Road
Round Lake, Illinois 60073-2835
Phone: (847) 546-8225
Fax: (847) 546-9210
Web: www.grievecorp.com
Email: sales@grievecorp.com
Attention: Frank Calabrese

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1250°F High Temperature Horizontal Air Flow Cabinet Oven from Grieve

Horizontal Air Flow Cabinet OvenNo. 1045 is a 1250°F (677°C), high temperature horizontal air flow cabinet oven from Grieve, currently used for heat treating at the customer’s facility. Workspace dimensions of this oven measure 38” W x 38” D x 38” H. A 350,000 BTU/HR is installed in a modulating natural gas burner, while a 2000 CFM, 2 HP recirculating blower provides horizontal airflow.

This Grieve horizontal air flow cabinet oven features 12” thick insulated walls comprised of 2” of 2300°F ceramic blanket and 10” of 10 lb/cf density rockwool. Features include an aluminized steel exterior, 16 ga stainless steel interior and a 325 CFM powered forced exhauster. Additional features include inner and outer door gaskets, inner gasket seals directly against door plug and outer gasket seals directly against front face of oven, plus all safety equipment required by IRI, FM and National Fire Protection Association Standard 86 for gas-heated equipment.

Controls on the No. 1045 include a digital indicating temperature controller.


For more information, please contact:
THE GRIEVE CORPORATION
500 Hart Road
Round Lake, Illinois 60073-2835
Phone: (847) 546-8225
Fax: (847) 546-9210
Web: www.grievecorp.com
Email: sales@grievecorp.com
Attention: Frank Calabrese.

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Digitalization…Its Time Has Come!

By Ryan Jarvis, Head of Vertical Markets for Food, Beverage & CPG, Siemens Industry, Inc., Factory Automation

Ryan JarvisEditor Note: In this article, the author makes the case for the digital factory in food & beverage processing.  Much of the input here resulted from a “panel of experts” discussion held recently at the 2018 Manufacturing in America trade event, sponsored by Siemens at Ford Field in downtown Detroit, Michigan. 

In a recent study we conducted at Siemens, where we talked to 40 firms in food & beverage, it was determined that over 50% of firms are already using connected sensors in their operations.  Likewise, 60% are using digitalization tools such as track-and-trace to monitor ingredient flow through their supply chain.  Finally, over two-thirds of those surveyed are encouraging their suppliers to provide data from their own operations and production processes, improving transparency and creating new opportunities to drive efficiencies.

That’s the good news.

On the flip side, less than half are using advanced data analytics, 85% have lag times over 24 hours between data collection and analysis, plus, perhaps the most challenging fact, over a quarter of the companies surveyed do not yet have a fully defined data management strategy.

In the past, the notion of a food or beverage processor being able to look at a prioritized set of data, in the cloud, in real time, making OEE, shift or even complete plant utilization assessments and sending instantaneous triggers for corrective action to the factory floor with remote, ongoing data back-up for further analysis that included supply chain and even consumer feedback would have been a wish list item.

Not anymore.

With the onset of complete product lifecycle management (PLM) technology, coupled with advanced machine controls, data gathering devices and communications software, with platform-as-a-service capabilities, today’s processor can transition to the digital factory with greater ease and confidence than previously thought possible.  As one industry expert observed, “Digitalization is making its entry into our market, but it does require management to have vision, a competent team to do an evaluation and a trusted supply chain of vendors and integrators to make it happen.”

Line efficiency, speed, product validation, production tracking and, a rapidly emerging trend in our business, namely, the need to have flexibility in the line for changeovers to meet the increased variety demands of the buying public are all drivers in this rapidly evolving landscape of the digital factory.

Expanding on some of these points:

  1. The cost of downtime can be hundreds of thousands of dollars a day. By using sensors to monitor machinery, plant personnel can gain access in real-time to all data on performance, quality and associated profitability.  Predictive analysis and maintenance can significantly reduce downtime by anticipating faults and failures before they occur.
  2. Higher productivity with lower inventory can be achieved more easily in a digital environment, as every aspect of production is constantly monitored, while order histories are compared and extended out into the production cycle expectations. One meat product producer saves hundreds of thousands of dollars every year from tracking weight variances, for example, realizing just a 0.10% improvement in yield.
  3. Mobile monitoring, RFID tags and in-package sensors are tracking a variety of real-time information to ensure compliance with cold-chain requirements. The trade associations are likewise moving into a standardized set of communication protocols…think OMAC and PAC ML…to streamline the connectivity and data tracking of processing and production lines alike.

 

During the recent Manufacturing in America event at Ford Field in Detroit, at a Futures Forum sponsored by Siemens, a panel of industry experts from various segments of the food, beverage and CPG market gathered to discuss the trends in digitalization and its impact on their companies, their equipment and, of critical importance, their people, both current and future team members. 

This recap summarizes a very lively 90-minute discussion held at the Forum, which was moderated by the author. 

Panelists for Manufacturing in America Food, Beverage & CPG Futures Forum (left to right in photo) Todd Slater Manager-Design/R&D Supply Chain Center of Excellence Bill Meier Principal Controls Global Technology Engineer Mars Wrigley Confectionery Co. Patrick Zambon Controls Engineer Founders Brewing Co. Ryan Jarvis Head of Vertical Markets for Food, Beverage & CPG Siemens Factory Automation Dave Greenfield Director of Content/Editor-in-Chief Automation World (trade publication) Cameron Cane President Deutsche Beverage Charles I. Sheets, PE Master Engineer – Automation Industrial Systems Division Matrix Technologies Inc.

The session included a review of the best practices and outlook for digitalization among the manufacturers, equipment builders and others in the supply chain, as well as the editor from a leading automation trade magazine.

While the participants were already engaged at different levels in the digitalization process, one remaining hurdle was exactly that degree of difference, as it impacts their relationship with vendors, distributors, automation integrators and end users alike.

Most all at the forum had significant automation and digital factory initiatives in progress or planned for the near future, a very positive sign for the industry in its quest for global competitiveness.

As consumer demand for product diversification, transparency in ingredient sourcing and even the packaging variances between the local grocer and the big box retail operation all affect the operation of the food & beverage industry, the future opportunities for digitalization and its possibilities for manufacturers will continue to expand at a rapid pace.

Another key concern for the group was the process of introducing employees, including those with decades of experience on the job but little exposure to the digital world, to this emerging trend.  Most companies were actively engaged in training, both for the current labor force and the next generation.  It was agreed that the machines and equipment in the factory needed to reflect the HMI qualities of the consumer electronics that occupy so much of modern life today.  As a collateral benefit, the digital factory, by definition, would attract more young talent to enter the manufacturing field.  As one participant put it, “They expect digital nowadays.”

On the logistics of implementing digitalization, it was unanimously agreed that one-off projects would not achieve the desired results with any efficiencies.  The better approach was a thorough plan, developed by the end user working with their machinery, equipment and automation suppliers, as well as customers, to achieve an optimum hierarchy of needs.

All agreed line efficiency and speed were paramount on the scale of basic requirements for an effective system.  Product validation and production tracking in a digital environment means analyzing not merely collecting data, in real time.  The goal is delivery of actionable knowledge about the process, they concurred.

For the factory floor, the impact of robotics was a very lively topic of discussion.  It was noted that “…robots can replace but also augment people and this will require an entirely new paradigm of ergonomics.”

On the financial front, it was agreed that driving management to implement digitalization must be more than a decision about dollars.  The future of the companies that were major players in food & beverage 50 years ago was directly tied to their willingness to adapt every aspect of their companies to the changing tastes and purchasing practices of the buying public.  Today, there are myriad means available for the younger generation to acquire everything they touch, wear, taste, drive and consume.  The smart companies, it was mused, will be the SMART companies, meaning those who incorporate the digital factory precepts into their entire operation and company vision.

The following list was suggested as areas where digitalization would have influence in the industry today…

  • Product development
  • Line design
  • Manufacturing layout
  • Scalability of production
  • Importance of industry and trade association standards
  • Data/Control/Analysis
  • Packaging
  • Adding value and pricing structures
  • Customer influencing/User experience with product
  • Fair treatment of sourcing locations and resident talent base
  • GMO/Good Citizen Status/Defect Detection
  • Product lifecycle and MES

Finally, the fun part…an outlook overview on the future of the market, from the perspective of the participants on the panel and in the audience.  All the following areas were discussed as potential and, in some cases, already initiated areas for digitalization to become a positive factor…

  • Traceability for immediate resolution as a driver of brand equity
  • Higher levels of automation along the entire process chain
  • Competitive trends being accelerated
  • Block chain evolution that will further accelerate the buy cycles
  • Long range scanning by metrology methods for improved plant utilization improvement
  • Ongoing use of digitalization to track machine operations and security of all data
  • Faster time to market through a pro-active effort between users and their machine OEMs and retrofitters alike, to anticipate trends and react
  • Consumer expectation modeling
  • Response paradigm for companies, as they address the needs for internal improvements

Author:

Ryan Jarvis may be contacted for comments or questions at ryan.jarvis@siemens.com.  

About Siemens USA

Siemens Corporation is a U.S. subsidiary of Siemens AG, a global powerhouse focusing on the areas of electrification, automation and digitalization. One of the world’s largest producers of energy-efficient, resource-saving technologies, Siemens is a leading supplier of systems for power generation and transmission as well as medical diagnosis. With approximately 348,000 employees in more than 190 countries, Siemens reported worldwide revenue of $86.2 billion in fiscal 2015. Siemens in the USA reported revenue of $22.4 billion, including $5.5 billion in exports, and employs approximately 50,000 people throughout all 50 states and Puerto Rico.

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500°F Universal Air Flow Oven from Grieve

No. 1043 is a 500°F (260°C), special universal air flow oven from Grieve, currently used to post-cure hose lengths at the customer’s facility. Workspace dimensions of this oven measure 12” W x 30” D x 12” H. 24KW are installed in Incoloy sheathed tubular heating elements, while a 2000 CFM, 2 HP recirculating blower provides front to rear universal airflow.

Universal Air Flow OvenThis Grieve universal air flow oven features 6” insulated walls, aluminized steel exterior and Type 304, 2B finish stainless steel interior. Additional features include truck wheel guide tracks on floor and an integral leg stand.

Controls on the No. 1043 include a digital programming temperature controller, manual reset excess temperature controller with separate contactors and a recirculating blower airflow safety switch.


For more information, please contact:
THE GRIEVE CORPORATION
500 Hart Road
Round Lake, Illinois 60073-2835
Phone: (847) 546-8225
Fax: (847) 546-9210
Web: www.grievecorp.com
Email: sales@grievecorp.com
Attention: Frank Calabrese.

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